Last updated: August 11, 2021

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You have already heard that Ashwagandha powder can be used in many ways and that it can alleviate complaints caused by stressful situations? But you don't know enough about Ashwagandha to be convinced of its effects and would like to know more about taking it and the necessary criteria for buying it? Then this is the right place for you.

We are pleased that you have found your way to our large Ashwagandha powder test 2021. Here you will find all the information and facts you need to know about ashwagandha powder. You will not only learn about the healing effects of the Ashwagandha plant, but also how you can process Ashwagandha powder yourself.




The most important facts

  • Ashwagandha, or sleeping berry or winter cherry, has had an important place in the Indian healing art of Ayurveda for over 3000 years due to its versatile applicability.
  • Ashwagandha powder is sold as a dietary supplement and is used, among other things, for stress, sexual dysfunction and obesity, as well as to strengthen cognitive abilities and the immune system.
  • You can avoid the natural bitter taste of ashwagandha powder by mixing it into a delicious base of your choice. This can be smoothies, juices, or yoghurts, among other things.

The Best Ashwagandha Powder: Our Picks

Buying and evaluation criteria for ashwagandha powder

When buying ashwagandha powder, you can pay attention to various aspects, such as:

By making the right choice for you, you can save money and also ensure that you do not add anything to your body that it does not need. Therefore, always look for high quality and ask to see the manufacturer's certificates if necessary.

Ingredients

Ashwagandha is a herbaceous plant that bears red berries and resembles the European physalis. However, only the leaves and roots are used for food supplements such as ashwagandha powder.

In high-quality ashwagandha powder products, only the roots of the plant should be used.

When buying Ashwagandha powder, you should be very careful that your product does not contain any chemical additives. Chemical additives such as release agents, fillers or superplasticisers are superfluous in Ashwagandha powder and sometimes unhealthy. Moreover, Ashwagandha products without preservatives and additives are considered more effective.

You can recognise Ashwagandha powder without such chemical substances by the labels "100 percent pure Ashwagandha", "without additives", or similar labels.

Withanolide content

The positive effect of ashwagandha is due to the withanolides it contains. Withanolides are natural chemical compounds that occur in nightshade plants, to which ashwagandha also belongs.

The effects and applications of ashwagandha products are attributed to withanolides. According to this, the withanolides contained in ashwagandha are decisive for the positive effect of the products. As a rule, the withanolide content is between 2.5 and 8 percent.

A high withanolide content represents a stronger effect of the ashwagandha powder.

If you do not find any information about the withanolide content on your ashwagandha powder, this may indicate a very low withanolide content of the product. In this case, you should avoid the product and use ashwagandha powder from another supplier.

Origin

The Ashwagandha plant originally comes from the Near East and South Asia, Africa and China and has become known through the Indian healing art of Ayurveda. The largest exporters of ashwagandha powder are India, the United States of America, Canada and Australia.

When buying ashwagandha powder, you should pay attention to the origin. Although many ashwagandha powders come from controlled organic cultivation, by no means all of them do.

Organic certificates provide information about the sustainability of your ashwagandha powder. The most common indication of sustainable consumption is the EU organic label for organically produced products.

Shelf life

Ashwagandha powder is preferred over the fresh ashwagandha plant or other dosage forms mainly because of the shelf life of the product. Most products will keep for up to 12 months after opening if stored dry, airtight and protected from light.

The quantity and size of the product will often tell you how long you can use the product before it runs out. If you are planning a long-term use of ashwagandha powder, then products with the largest possible quantity will be more price-efficient for you.

If you are using Ashwagandha powder for the first time and want to try it out first, then you should go for small quantities of the product.

As a rule, the amount of ashwagandha powder varies between 100 and 750 grams.

Occasionally, however, larger quantities of Ashwagandha powder products are offered and sold. These often contain over 1000 grams of Ashwagandha powder. Such quantities of Ashwagandha powder are rarely practical and should only be purchased if you can guarantee that you can use up the Ashwagandha powder within a year.

Guide: Frequently asked questions about Ashwagandha powder answered in detail

In order to inform you comprehensively about the effectiveness of ashwagandha powder and to give you an understanding of the current state of science, we have summarised all the important information in the following sections.

What is Ashwagandha powder and how does it work?

Ashwagandha is a plant that is also known as sleeping berry, winter cherry and Indian ginseng in German-speaking countries. Ashwagandha was already used for medicinal purposes 3000 years ago.

Especially in the Indian healing art of Ayurveda, the Ashwagandha plant is used because it is said that it can alleviate physical and mental complaints.

Ashwagandha is used to treat a long list of symptoms and diseases. The positive effect is mainly due to the withanolides. In the following we will show you the essential effects of Ashwagandha powder.

Effects on stress and psychological strain

Stress and insomnia are often triggered by stress hormones. For decades, researchers have been certain that the stress hormone cortisol plays a central role in anxiety disorders and panic attacks. (1)

Ashwagandha Pulver-1

To calm the body and mind in stressful situations, many people turn to ashwagandha as a natural sedative.
(Image source: Nik Shuliahin / unsplash)

According to an Indian study, ashwagandha effectively improves a person's resistance to stress, which can noticeably improve the quality of life. The researchers found that subjects who consumed ashwagandha over a period of 60 days had significantly lower cortisol levels. (2)

Ashwagandha can also reduce mental exhaustion during exertion. The study shows that subjects who regularly consumed ashwagandha had significant anti-stress activity. (3)

The use of ashwagandha for depression and similar psychological stress has a long tradition in the Indian medicine Ayurveda, which is now also recognised and researched in western medicine. (4, 5)

It is assumed that withanolides improve the sensitivity of the receptors for the so-called happiness hormone serotonin, which enables it to dock better. This has already been proven in animal studies. (4, 5)

Regular intake of ashwagandha has also been shown to reduce the symptoms of chronic stress and people suffering from depressive symptoms by almost 80 percent. (1)

However, it is very important to note at this point that ashwagandha is not a miracle cure for mental ailments. In cases of chronic stress and other mental illnesses, self-diagnosis and self-treatment should be avoided at all costs. Ashwagandha cannot replace professional treatment, but only support recovery.

Effect against overweight

Many people use ashwagandha to lose weight because ashwagandha is said to lower cortisol levels and stress, two factors known to cause weight gain. (6)

Scientists were able to confirm that after a regular intake of ashwagandha, the cortisol level as well as the body weight and the body mass index were significantly lower. In addition, it has been proven that the root has a positive influence on self-measured well-being and reduces food cravings. (7)

Results of these studies suggest that ashwagandha root can be used to treat overweight adults under chronic stress. However, those who want to lose weight with ashwagandha do not have to be under psychological stress.

The plant compound withaferin A, which is found in the leaves of the ashwagandha plant, can help reduce the viability of fat cells and induce cell death of these fat cells more quickly. (8)

For better athletic performance

Many athletes use ashwagandha to improve their performance. Some studies indicate that withania somnifera in the ashwagandha plant increases maximum respiratory volume and reduces the time to fatigue, which is why ashwagandha is particularly suitable for endurance athletes. (9, 10)

In addition, ashwagandha can support muscle building and reduce muscle damage induced by training. (11)

Strengthening the immune system

The steroid lactone withanolide A of the ashwagandha plant counteracts cortisol levels and thus stress, as already described. Stressful situations can weaken the human immune system, because in a "fight-or-flight" situation the immune system is not necessary for survival.

The effect of ashwagandha to strengthen the immune system is investigated in many animal studies.

Withanolide A has been shown to compensate for the immune system shutdown in stressful situations. (12, 13) In addition, the plant has an anti-inflammatory effect and increases the number of immunoglobulins (14)

However, the current state of research is not yet sufficient to be able to make similar statements about the human organism.

Strengthening memory function

Taking ashwagandha to strengthen memory function is a long-standing Ayurvedic tradition. According to a Japanese study, the withanolides can protect the brain from deposits between the nerve cells, thus improving neuroyal dysfunctions. (15)

Another study concluded that withanolides can reverse brain damage caused by HIV. (16)

Ashwagandha has also been shown to improve the cognitive and psychomotor abilities of healthy people, significantly increasing reaction time and alertness in a 14-day study. (17)

Increasing potency

Ashwagandha is also said to help with potency problems and other sexual dysfunctions. In an animal study, the plant substance Withania somnifera was shown to significantly increase testosterone levels in rats. (18)

However, one cannot make any statements about the human organism from an animal study.

In human studies, Ashwagandha has so far been shown to have a positive effect on sperm count and sperm quality in infertile men (19), but in other studies this effect could not be established beyond doubt.

For the sexual function of women, however, human studies have found a significant improvement in the categories of arousal, vaginal lubrication and orgasm. (20)

When and for whom is it useful to take ashwagandha powder?

Ashwagandha is particularly suitable for people who have mild symptoms of the above-mentioned complaints and are looking for a natural solution. Especially for predictable long-term stressful situations, such as exam phases, Ashwagandha powder can provide relief.

However, if you are suffering from severe symptoms, you should first consult a doctor before making any attempt at self-treatment.

How should Ashwagandha powder be dosed?

The optimal dosage varies from product to product, so it is best to check the leaflet or packaging of the product. In general, the dosage of ashwagandha powder is between 300 and 600 milligrams.

Initially, you should not exceed a dosage of 300 milligrams. If you do not notice any side effects after a few days, you can increase the dose to three times 300 milligrams per day. However, you should not exceed a daily dose of 1500 milligrams.

However, it is recommended by many suppliers to take a one-week break after a daily intake of more than 4 weeks. This not only gives your body a break, but also prevents you from becoming immune to the active ingredients in ashwagandha powder as quickly.

What are the side effects of taking Ashwagandha powder?

If you do not overdose on Ashwagandha, i.e. do not take more than 1,500 milligrams of the root extract per day, there are no side effects. In the case of an overdose, however, side effects such as abdominal pain and cramps, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea may occur.

If you take other medicines besides ashwagandha, you should be careful, as ashwagandha in combination with special chemical compounds can lead to unexpected interactions.

You should always discuss dietary changes, dietary supplements and the use of other natural and chemical medicines with your doctor.

What types of ashwagandha powders are available?

Ashwagandha in powder form is especially popular in the preparation of smoothies and protein shakes. Since ashwagandha is often not the only food supplement added to smoothies, it is not only available as a pure product, but also as a ready-made smoothie and shake powder.

Type Description
Pure Ashwagandha Powder Only the roots and leaves of the Ashwagandha plant are processed for Ashwagandha powder. No other fillers are included in high-quality products.
Ashwagandha in smoothie and shake powders in addition to ashwagandha powder, other food supplements such as wheat grass, moringa or turmeric are also processed here. There are an infinite number of combinations.

We will explain the advantages and disadvantages of both variants in more detail in the following section.

Pure ashwagandha powder

There are different ways to take ashwagandha in powder form. Ashwagandha powder is very often prepared as a tea, which you have to steep for 3-6 minutes.

Some other popular ways of preparing ashwagandha powder are smoothies and protein shakes, but you can also mix ashwagandha powder into yoghurt, fruit porridge or similar as described above.

Advantages
  • individual dosage possible
  • versatile processing possibilities
  • higher withanolide content
Disadvantages
  • complicated dosing
  • earthy taste by nature
  • clumps easily

Ashwagandha is famous and infamous for its earthy taste. To make it more palatable to you, you can use a base that you like, then you won't taste the ashwagandha powder. There are no limits to your choice.

Ashwagandha in smoothie powders

Smoothie and protein shake powders are available with many different ingredients in all kinds of combinations. Powders that also contain ashwagandha are not uncommon.

Ashwagandha Pulver-3

Smoothie powders combine ashwagandha powder and the active ingredients of many other natural plant substances.
(Image source: Angel Sinigersky / unsplash)

In addition to ashwagandha, smoothie powders often contain over 20 other natural superfoods. The most commonly used ingredients besides ashwagandha are wheatgrass, barley grass powder, spirulina and flaxseed powder.

The smoothie powder is simply added when preparing smoothies and protein shakes. Depending on the formula and the proportion of ingredients, you can add these superfood powders to your smoothies depending on the situation.

Which Ashwagandha powder form is best for you, you can determine individually for yourself, because there is no right or wrong here.

Advantages
  • Versatile ingredients for optimal nutritional supplementation
  • Good taste
  • Easy to use and prepare
Disadvantages
  • Unclear ingredients
  • Comparatively expensive
  • Low withanolide content

If you want to test a dietary supplement specifically for the ingredients of Ashwagandha, then a pure Ashwagandha powder is best. However, if you would like to test a food supplement with superfoods in general, a complex powder with ashwagandha and many other natural active ingredients might be interesting.

How is Ashwagandha powder processed?

Ashwagandha powder is often processed with other liquids. Ashwagandha can be brewed as a tea. This method of preparation is particularly popular before going to bed, as the warm drink has a calming effect.

You can also add ashwagandha powder to a smoothie or protein shake, or mix it into a bowl or yoghurt and fruit puree like any other food supplement.

Ashwagandha Pulver-2

You won't taste the bitterness of the ashwagandha powder in smoothies or bowls.
(Image source: Tina Witherspoon / unsplash)

The powder of the ashwagandha plant is difficult to mix under cold water, as it is very floury and quickly clumps together, but you can basically take the powder over a glass of juice or water.

How much does Ashwagandha powder cost?

There are large price differences between the various ashwagandha powder products. The price range is between 2 and 25 euros per 100 grams. This big difference in price is not only due to quantity and quality, but also due to different ingredients.

Type price per 100 grams
Pure Ashwagandha powder 2 to 5 euros
Food supplements 7 to 25 euros

You can usually get pure ashwagandha powder for 2 to 5 euros per 100 grams. For food supplements that contain ashwagandha, among other things, you have to dig a little deeper into your pocket. The price ranges from 7 to over 25 euros per 100 grams.

What are the alternatives to Ashwagandha powder?

Ashwagandha can be consumed in many forms. However, the ashwagandha plant is very rarely sold as a medicinal herb, but is usually processed beforehand. Each form of administration has its own advantages and disadvantages, which we would like to present to you in the following section.

Type Description
Ashwagandha capsules Ashwagandha capsules have the great advantage that they are proportioned, which makes it possible to take the food supplement evenly and accurately. In addition, Ashwagandha capsules are neutral in taste.
Ashwagandha tea Ashwagandha tea consists of dried Ashwagandha roots. It has a very bitter taste, which can be counteracted with sweeteners and spices. To prepare Ashwagandha tea you can also use Ashwagandha powder or fresh roots.
Ashwagandha root Ashwagandha root can also be consumed fresh, but it has a very bitter taste. This type of consumption is said to be helpful for oral hygiene and kill bacteria in the mouth, as well as provide relief for toothache.

Each of the alternatives mentioned here has its own advantages and disadvantages that you have to weigh up.

Of course, there are other medicinal plants that can help you depending on your symptoms. For example, lavender and St. John's wort are suitable for sleep disorders, and if you need an energy boost, guarana, which contains caffeine, can also help.

When should I avoid taking ashwagandha powder?

Ashwagandha should not be taken during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

People suffering from stomach ulcers and other digestive problems should also refrain from taking Ashwagandha, as Ashwagandha can have an irritating effect on the digestive tract.

As a matter of principle, ashwagandha should not be taken by children under 12 years of age.

Image source: martinak / 123rf

References (20)

1. Mason, J. W., Giller, E. L., Kosten, T. R., Ostroff, R. B., & Podd, L. (1986). Urinary free-cortisol levels in posttraumatic stress disorder patients. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 174(3), 145–149. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005053-198603000-00003
Source

2. Chandrasekhar K, Kapoor J, Anishetty S. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian J Psychol Med. 2012 Jul;34(3):255-62. doi: 10.4103/0253-7176.106022.
Source

3. Singh B, Saxena AK, Chandan BK, Gupta DK, Bhutani KK, Anand KK. Adaptogenic activity of a novel, withanolide-free aqueous fraction from the roots of Withania somnifera Dun. Phytother Res. 2001 Jun;15(4):311-8. doi: 10.1002/ptr.858.
Source

4. Tripathi AK, Dey S, Singh RH, Dey PK. Alterations in the sensitivity of 5(th) receptor subtypes following chronic asvagandha treatment in rats. Anc Sci Life. 1998 Jan;17(3):169-81.
Source

5. Ramanathan, M., Balaji, B., & Justin, A. (2011). Behavioural and neurochemical evaluation of Perment an herbal formulation in chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depressive model. Indian journal of experimental biology, 49(4), 269–275.
Source

6. Tomiyama, A. J., Mann, T., Vinas, D., Hunger, J. M., DeJager, J., & Taylor, S. E. (2010). Low calorie dieting increases cortisol. Psychosomatic medicine, 72(4), 357.
Source

7. Choudhary, D., Bhattacharyya, S., & Joshi, K. (2017). Body weight management in adults under chronic stress through treatment with Ashwagandha root extract: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of evidence-based complementary & alternative medicine, 22(1), 96-106.
Source

8. Park, H. J., Rayalam, S., Della-Fera, M. A., Ambati, S., Yang, J. Y., & Baile, C. A. (2008). Withaferin A induces apoptosis and inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. BioFactors (Oxford, England), 33(2), 137–148. https://doi.org/10.1002/biof.5520330206
Source

9. Shenoy, S., Chaskar, U., Sandhu, J. S., & Paadhi, M. M. (2012). Effects of eight-week supplementation of Ashwagandha on cardiorespiratory endurance in elite Indian cyclists. Journal of Ayurveda and integrative medicine, 3(4), 209–214. https://doi.org/10.4103/0975-9476.10444
Source

10. Choudhary, B., Shetty, A., & Langade, D. G. (2015). Efficacy of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera [L.] Dunal) in improving cardiorespiratory endurance in healthy athletic adults. Ayu, 36(1), 63–68. https://doi.org/10.4103/0974-8520.169002
Source

11. Wankhede, S., Langade, D., Joshi, K., Sinha, S. R., & Bhattacharyya, S. (2015). Examining the effect of Withania somnifera supplementation on muscle strength and recovery: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12, 43. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-015-0104-9
Source

12. Khan, B., Ahmad, S. F., Bani, S., Kaul, A., Suri, K. A., Satti, N. K., Athar, M., & Qazi, G. N. (2006). Augmentation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and Th-1 cytokines by Withania somnifera in stressed mice. International immunopharmacology, 6(9), 1394–1403. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2006.04.001
Source

13. Kour, K., Pandey, A., Suri, K. A., Satti, N. K., Gupta, K. K., & Bani, S. (2009). Restoration of stress-induced altered T cell function and corresponding cytokines patterns by Withanolide A. International immunopharmacology, 9(10), 1137–1144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2009.05.011
Source

14. Malik, F., Singh, J., Khajuria, A., Suri, K. A., Satti, N. K., Singh, S., Kaul, M. K., Kumar, A., Bhatia, A., & Qazi, G. N. (2007). A standardized root extract of Withania somnifera and its major constituent withanolide-A elicit humoral and cell-mediated immune responses by up regulation of Th1-dominant polarization in BALB/c mice. Life sciences, 80(16), 1525–1538. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2007.01.029
Source

15. Kuboyama, T., Tohda, C., & Komatsu, K. (2006). Withanoside IV and its active metabolite, sominone, attenuate Abeta(25-35)-induced neurodegeneration. The European journal of neuroscience, 23(6), 1417–1426. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2006.04664.x
Source

16. Kurapati, K. R., Atluri, V. S., Samikkannu, T., & Nair, M. P. (2013). Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) reverses β-amyloid1-42 induced toxicity in human neuronal cells: implications in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). PloS one, 8(10), e77624. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077624
Source

17. Choudhary, D., Bhattacharyya, S., & Bose, S. (2017). Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal) Root Extract in Improving Memory and Cognitive Functions. Journal of dietary supplements, 14(6), 599–612. https://doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2017.1284970
Source

18. Kiasalari, Z., Khalili, M., & AGHAEI, M. (2009). Effect of withania somnifera on levels of sex hormones in the diabetic male rats.
Source

19. Ahmad, M. K., Mahdi, A. A., Shukla, K. K., Islam, N., Rajender, S., Madhukar, D., Shankhwar, S. N., & Ahmad, S. (2010). Withania somnifera improves semen quality by regulating reproductive hormone levels and oxidative stress in seminal plasma of infertile males. Fertility and sterility, 94(3), 989–996. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2009.04.046
Source

20. Swati Dongre, Deepak Langade, Sauvik Bhattacharyya, "Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) Root Extract in Improving Sexual Function in Women: A Pilot Study", BioMed Research International, vol. 2015, Article ID 284154, 9 pages, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/284154
Source

Why you can trust me?

Wissenschaftliche Studie
Mason, J. W., Giller, E. L., Kosten, T. R., Ostroff, R. B., & Podd, L. (1986). Urinary free-cortisol levels in posttraumatic stress disorder patients. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 174(3), 145–149. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005053-198603000-00003
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Chandrasekhar K, Kapoor J, Anishetty S. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian J Psychol Med. 2012 Jul;34(3):255-62. doi: 10.4103/0253-7176.106022.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Singh B, Saxena AK, Chandan BK, Gupta DK, Bhutani KK, Anand KK. Adaptogenic activity of a novel, withanolide-free aqueous fraction from the roots of Withania somnifera Dun. Phytother Res. 2001 Jun;15(4):311-8. doi: 10.1002/ptr.858.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Tripathi AK, Dey S, Singh RH, Dey PK. Alterations in the sensitivity of 5(th) receptor subtypes following chronic asvagandha treatment in rats. Anc Sci Life. 1998 Jan;17(3):169-81.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Ramanathan, M., Balaji, B., & Justin, A. (2011). Behavioural and neurochemical evaluation of Perment an herbal formulation in chronic unpredictable mild stress induced depressive model. Indian journal of experimental biology, 49(4), 269–275.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Tomiyama, A. J., Mann, T., Vinas, D., Hunger, J. M., DeJager, J., & Taylor, S. E. (2010). Low calorie dieting increases cortisol. Psychosomatic medicine, 72(4), 357.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Choudhary, D., Bhattacharyya, S., & Joshi, K. (2017). Body weight management in adults under chronic stress through treatment with Ashwagandha root extract: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of evidence-based complementary & alternative medicine, 22(1), 96-106.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Park, H. J., Rayalam, S., Della-Fera, M. A., Ambati, S., Yang, J. Y., & Baile, C. A. (2008). Withaferin A induces apoptosis and inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. BioFactors (Oxford, England), 33(2), 137–148. https://doi.org/10.1002/biof.5520330206
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Shenoy, S., Chaskar, U., Sandhu, J. S., & Paadhi, M. M. (2012). Effects of eight-week supplementation of Ashwagandha on cardiorespiratory endurance in elite Indian cyclists. Journal of Ayurveda and integrative medicine, 3(4), 209–214. https://doi.org/10.4103/0975-9476.10444
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Choudhary, B., Shetty, A., & Langade, D. G. (2015). Efficacy of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera [L.] Dunal) in improving cardiorespiratory endurance in healthy athletic adults. Ayu, 36(1), 63–68. https://doi.org/10.4103/0974-8520.169002
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Wankhede, S., Langade, D., Joshi, K., Sinha, S. R., & Bhattacharyya, S. (2015). Examining the effect of Withania somnifera supplementation on muscle strength and recovery: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12, 43. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-015-0104-9
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Khan, B., Ahmad, S. F., Bani, S., Kaul, A., Suri, K. A., Satti, N. K., Athar, M., & Qazi, G. N. (2006). Augmentation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and Th-1 cytokines by Withania somnifera in stressed mice. International immunopharmacology, 6(9), 1394–1403. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2006.04.001
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Kour, K., Pandey, A., Suri, K. A., Satti, N. K., Gupta, K. K., & Bani, S. (2009). Restoration of stress-induced altered T cell function and corresponding cytokines patterns by Withanolide A. International immunopharmacology, 9(10), 1137–1144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2009.05.011
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Malik, F., Singh, J., Khajuria, A., Suri, K. A., Satti, N. K., Singh, S., Kaul, M. K., Kumar, A., Bhatia, A., & Qazi, G. N. (2007). A standardized root extract of Withania somnifera and its major constituent withanolide-A elicit humoral and cell-mediated immune responses by up regulation of Th1-dominant polarization in BALB/c mice. Life sciences, 80(16), 1525–1538. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2007.01.029
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Kuboyama, T., Tohda, C., & Komatsu, K. (2006). Withanoside IV and its active metabolite, sominone, attenuate Abeta(25-35)-induced neurodegeneration. The European journal of neuroscience, 23(6), 1417–1426. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2006.04664.x
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Kurapati, K. R., Atluri, V. S., Samikkannu, T., & Nair, M. P. (2013). Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) reverses β-amyloid1-42 induced toxicity in human neuronal cells: implications in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). PloS one, 8(10), e77624. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077624
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Choudhary, D., Bhattacharyya, S., & Bose, S. (2017). Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal) Root Extract in Improving Memory and Cognitive Functions. Journal of dietary supplements, 14(6), 599–612. https://doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2017.1284970
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Wissenschaftliche Studie
Kiasalari, Z., Khalili, M., & AGHAEI, M. (2009). Effect of withania somnifera on levels of sex hormones in the diabetic male rats.
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Wissenschaftliche Studie
Ahmad, M. K., Mahdi, A. A., Shukla, K. K., Islam, N., Rajender, S., Madhukar, D., Shankhwar, S. N., & Ahmad, S. (2010). Withania somnifera improves semen quality by regulating reproductive hormone levels and oxidative stress in seminal plasma of infertile males. Fertility and sterility, 94(3), 989–996. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2009.04.046
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Wissenschaftliche Studie
Swati Dongre, Deepak Langade, Sauvik Bhattacharyya, "Efficacy and Safety of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) Root Extract in Improving Sexual Function in Women: A Pilot Study", BioMed Research International, vol. 2015, Article ID 284154, 9 pages, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/284154
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Reviews