Last updated: August 12, 2021

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If you are familiar with the effects of green tea, then you should have heard of Gyokuro. Among the many varieties of green tea on the market, Gyokuro tea is one of the most health-promoting teas. Due to the natural caffeine content and antioxidants in Gyokuro, this tea is used for several ailments.

With our big Gyokuro test 2021 we compare the different Gyokuro products on the market to help you make a decision. We also list the many health benefits of Gyokuo and explain how to use and prepare Gyokuro properly.

The most important facts

  • Gyokuro is a type of green tea. Due to the special cultivation, Gyokuro leaves contain many minerals and amino acids that are considered beneficial to health.
  • Gyokuro is considered anti-inflammatory and harmonising for kidney, bladder, heart or circulatory problems. In addition, Gyokuro is considered to be cancer-preventive and anti-mutagenic.
  • Gyokuro can be consumed in case of complaints or daily. Due to the caffeine content in Gyokuro, it is recommended to consume the tea in the morning to wake up and stimulate the metabolism.

The Best Gyokur: Our Picks

Buying and evaluation criteria for Gyokuro products

When buying Gyokuro, you should pay attention to various aspects, such as:

In the following paragraphs, we explain to you what is important in the various buying criteria so that you can choose the right Gyokuro product for you.

Type of use

In order not to distort the effect and aroma of the needles, the needles are sold as loose tea or in tea bags

Gyokuro is sold exclusively as tea.

The loose tea is stored in a resealable bag to preserve the aroma and keep the needles fresh.Gyokuro in tea bags is relatively rare, but nevertheless advantageous, especially if you want to prepare it quickly and easily.

Flavour

Gyokuro tea can be purchased in a variety of flavours. There are many different flavours, especially when Gyokuro tea is paired with other tea varieties.

The special taste of Gyokuro tea comes from the "umami", which is created by the special cultivation of Gyokuro. Pure Gyokuro tea therefore tastes uniquely mild-sweet and spicy.

Depending on the origin, the tea is sold as "Gyokuro Asahi", "Gykuro Hiki" or "Gyokuro Mikoto". However, the taste does not change. You can find out more about this under "Origin".

In addition to pure Gyokuro tea, there are also tea blends. The taste changes depending on the type of tea added.

For example, Gyokuro is sold as a tea together with other types of green tea such as Matcha or Sincha and therefore has a sweeter or more bitter taste.

Origin

Gyokuro is grown and processed differently depending on its origin. This is due in particular to the climatic conditions, the soil or the sunlight of the growing region.

When buying Gyokuro, pay special attention to the origin, as this plays a major role in the quality.

Gyokuro comes from Japan and is therefore the most dominant producer of Gyokuro tea. The Kagoshima region in Japan, for example, is known for organic Gyokuro, while the Uji region is known for its high-quality Gyokuro

In addition to Japan, Gyokuro is also planted and produced in China, but in the Japanese style.

Quality

As already mentioned, origin plays a major role in the quality of Gyokuro. Therefore, pay special attention to where the product was planted and produced.

Many producers also work with organic testing agencies and have their products tested. Many consumers of green tea have doubts about Japanese tea after the accident in Fukushima.

Therefore, many manufacturers have their products tested and labelled. Therefore, look for purity certificates, certificates or laboratory tests regarding pesticides or radioactivity in the product description.

Guide: Questions you should ask yourself before buying Gyokuro products

In order to inform you comprehensively about the effectiveness of goykuro and to give you an understanding of the current state of science, we have summarised all the important information in the following sections.

What is Gyokuro and what effects does it have?

Gyokuro is a high-quality Japanese shade tea made from the needles of the Gyoku tree. The name "Gyokuro" comes from the Japanese and translates as "pearl dew", which is due to the shape of the tea needles.

Gyokuro
Gyokuro can be recognised by its dark green, narrow leaves. Due to the special cultivation, the gyokuro needles contain many substances with healing properties. (Image source: highnesser / Pixabay)

Due to the shading of the needles, Gyokuro has many health-promoting effects. Gyokuro contains substances such as (1) due to the special shade cultivation:

  • L-theanine
  • Amino acids
  • Fatty acids
  • Chlorophyll
  • Polyphenols
  • Minerals
  • natural caffeine

Kidneys

Due to the antioxidants, Gyokuro can be antibacterial, antispasmodic, diuretic and anti-inflammatory for kidney or bladder problems.

The ingestion and later excretion of Gyukuro tea flushes the kidneys and bladder with the active ingredient.

Studies confirm the effect. For example, it has been found that daily intake of Gyokuro can alleviate kidney and bladder infections and even inhibit kidney stone formation (2).

Metabolism

Due to the high but natural content of caffeine bound to amino acids, the intake of caffeine is not only well tolerated by the stomach, but also activates the metabolism (3).

Thus, Gyokuro tea can help stimulate digestion and even help with weight loss. Researchers have only tested the effects of caffeine on mice.

However, a clear result was found that caffeine stimulates the body to burn fat (4).

Brain

The naturally high caffeine content also has a positive effect on the brain. For example, laboratory tests on mice found that caffeine stimulates nerve cell activity in the brain, causing the body to release more adrenaline.

So Gyokuro tea can help reduce fatigue and increase brain power (5). But the active ingredient L-theanine in Gyokuro has also been studied.

Studies have found that the consumption of Gyokuro tea can improve the ability to perceive, as well as promote cell growth and neural differentiation in the brain.

Especially in older people, the intake of Gyokuro tea leads to a lower incidence of cognitive decline, i.e. the mental perception and processing of signals from the environment (1).

Heart & circulatory system

Several epidemiological studies and clinical trials showed that green tea, especially Gyokuro tea, can reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

The special shade cultivation produces many minerals and substances such as polyphenols and chlorophyll, which can reduce the risk of strokes and coronary heart disease.

Due to the shade cultivation, Gyokuro has health-promoting contents

Coronary heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, is prevalent in the Western world due to high-saturation diets.

Together with low physical activity and harmful environmental influences such as exhaust fumes or cigarette smoke, a large proportion of the population have high blood pressure.

A large number of epidemiological studies have confirmed the preventive effect of green tea consumption against arteriosclerosis and coronary heart disease.

In addition, consumption of Gyokuro tea can lower cholesterol and reduce high blood pressure (6).

Nervous system

Several studies confirm the positive effects of L-theanine, which is found in Gyokuro tea. For example, Gyokuro tea has been confirmed to have a calming effect on the body and mind.

Thus, stress can be reduced through the consumption of Gyokuro. But the enteric nervous system also benefits from Gykuro.

Since the enteric nervous system is connected to the soul, including mental stress, stomach and intestinal problems are often related to the psyche.

By taking Gyokuro, the enteric nervous system, i.e. the intestine, stomach and liver, can be relieved and become more balanced. L-theanine has a harmonising effect on the intestines and liver, so that the metabolism is activated and constipation can be relieved.

Studies confirm this effect using laboratory tests on rats. The results are clear and speak for the positive effects of L-theanine on the nervous system (7).

Cancer

Several epidemiological studies as well as studies on animals have shown that green tea, such as Gyokuro, can offer protection against various types of cancer such as skin, breast, prostate and lung cancer.

Because gykuro tea contains many amino acids, the tea is considered anti-mutagenic and anti-angiogenic, which means that tumour growth can be prevented.

Several possible mechanisms of action may explain the cancer-preventive aspects of green tea, especially in terms of anti-inflammatory effects (5).

Several studies have also shown that amino acids such as L-theanines, catechins and theaflavins in gyukuro tea may reduce the risk of several types of cancer. However, the evidence from preclinical and clinical studies is not clear (8).

When and for whom is it useful to take Gyokuro?

Because gyokuro contains caffeine, only adults should consume gyokuro tea.

In general, it is recommended to drink Gyokuro tea in the morning after getting up or after strenuous activities for the brain.

Gyokuro is particularly suitable for people with the following complaints:

  • Kidney and bladder infections
  • High blood pressure
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of concentration
  • Stress
  • Constipation
  • Slow metabolism
  • Stomach and intestinal complaints

Due to the amino acids and caffeine content in Gyokuro, the tea has a stimulating and harmonising effect, as well as an anti-inflammatory and calming effect (9).

How is Gyokuro tea prepared?

To prepare Gyokuro tea properly, you will need some materials to help you. If you plan to make Gyokuro tea a regular part of your tea assortment, it would be worth buying a "Kyusu".

This is a small teapot in which you can pour the tea and serve it without pouring out the leaves.

In the following instructions, we describe how you should prepare Gyokuro tea:

  1. Preparation: Prepare your tea set and the necessary materials. For the preparation you will need a teapot, a cup, a kettle and a tablespoon.
  2. Infusion: Bring the water to the boil and let it cool down to about 50 - 70 degrees Celsius. In the meantime, add a tablespoon of tea to the pot. When the water has cooled down a little, pour 60 ml of water over the tea in the pot.
  3. Let it steep: Depending on your taste, let the tea steep for 1 - 3 minutes so that the leaves just start to open.
  4. Serve: After the infusion time, you can serve the tea and pour it slowly into your cup. Drink the tea in small sips to fully appreciate the flavour.

Of course, you can let the tea steep longer or shorter, depending on your taste preference. Many Gyokuro tea beginners also prepare the tea with milk to soften the taste a little.

The water-tea ration is also freely selectable. However, a rule of thumb is to just cover the leaves with water. Make sure that the water temperature is correct so that the tea can fully develop its flavour.

If you pour the boiling water directly onto the Gykuro tea, you will distort the flavour, making the tea bitter instead of sweet.

As already mentioned, you can also infuse the Gyokuro leaves more often. The sequence of steps is the same.

How much do Gyokuro products cost?

Depending on the origin, cultivation and quality, the price of Gyokuro teas can vary greatly.

To give you a better overview, we have compiled a price list. The unit is the price in euros per gram of Gyokuro:

Product Price
Organic Gyokuro Approx. 0,17 Euro / gram
Japan Gyokuro Approx. 0,28 Euro / gram
Premium Gyokuro Circa 0,56 Euro / gram

Especially the Premium Gyokuro is in the more expensive price segment. Therefore, when buying, pay attention to the package size so that you can get a good deal.

What types of Gyokuro tea are there?

Due to the special harvest of Gyokuro, the product is sold exclusively as tea. There are two different types:

  • Loose herbs
  • Bag

Each variation brings with it different advantages and disadvantages, which we have listed below.

Loose herbs

Gyokuro as loose tea is the most common product form of Gyokuro. Here, the loose leaves are packed in a large, resealable plastic bag.

The advantage here is that the plastic bag ensures that the leaves stay fresh and the aroma is preserved.

Gyokuro
Gyokuro tea can be brewed up to three times without adulterating the taste. (Image source: ulleo / Pixabay)

Although preparing loose tea is more labour-intensive and time-consuming, it is worth it for the extraordinary taste experience of Gyokuro tea.

Advantages
  • Preserved flavour
  • Fresh leaves
  • Consistent taste

Disadvantages
  • High labour
  • High time
  • Extra tea material needed

If you like drinking green tea, choose Gyokuro loose tea to fully enjoy the flavour and aroma.

Bag

Gyokuro is rarely sold in bags. Some traders offer Gyokuro in tea bags, which can simply be brewed and consumed immediately.

However, the disadvantage here is that the aroma is not preserved by the tea bag. This could spoil the freshness and flavour of the tea.

Advantages
  • Easy to infuse
  • Cheaper
  • Less time-consuming

Disadvantages
  • Rare to buy
  • Often mixed with other types of tea
  • Adulteration of flavour

Gyokuro in tea bags is suitable for beginners or people who do not like green tea but drink it for their health. Because of the bags, the taste weakens somewhat and is therefore milder.

How should Gyokuro be dosed?

As mentioned in the study, it is possible to drink Gyokuro tea several times a day. An adult person can drink up to one litre of Gyokuro tea a day without any problems.

Our study found that daily consumption of 10 cups of green tea over a 9-year period can prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease (11)

However, depending on tolerance, the daily requirement of caffeine should not be exceeded, otherwise some side effects may occur (10).

What are the side effects of Gyokuro?

Excessive consumption of Gyokuro can cause some side effects. The high caffeine content in Gyokuro is the main trigger for side effects.

The following symptoms indicate excessive consumption of Gyokuo tea:

  • Dental plaque / discolouration
  • Interaction with medicines
  • Nervousness
  • Mild dizziness
  • Problems falling asleep
  • Excessive thirst
  • Dry skin
  • Stomach pain

If you experience these symptoms, you should consume less Gyokuro tea to reduce your caffeine intake (12).

How is Gyokuro made?

Gyokuro is grown in shade. This means that as soon as new buds form, the plantation is covered with woven straw mats.

This prevents sunlight from reaching the plantation, thus suppressing photosynthesis in the leaves. This process produces the many healing substances of Gyokuro, as well as the taste and "umami" of the tea.

In spring, the first Gyokuro leaves are harvested and steamed to preserve the colour and aroma of the leaves.

In the final step, the leaves are rolled so that the flavour is distributed throughout the leaf and the water content is removed. This gives the Gyokuro a longer shelf life and more intense flavour.

Finally, the finished Gyokuro leaves are packed in a vacuum bag and shipped to your home.

As you can see, the production of Gyokuro is very complex, which is why the price is generally higher than for other types of green tea.

What alternatives are there to Gyokuro?

Besides Gyokuro, there are other green teas with healing properties.

We have presented the following tea varieties in this table:

Alternative Active ingredient
Sencha higher content of antioxidants, supports cell renewal, reduces stress
Matcha Higher content of amino acids (L-theanine), Against fatigue, Relaxing effect
Kabusecha Effects of Sencha and Gyokuro

Of course there are more green teas with their benefits. However, this table is an excerpt in comparison on the same active ingredients as in Gyokuro tea (13).

Picture source: Rochu2008 / 123rf

References (13)

1. The role of glutamine in neurogenesis promoted by the green tea amino acid theanine in neural progenitor cells for brain health; The Institute of Prophylactic Pharmacology, Kita-Shinagawa, Shinagawa, 140-0001, Tokyo, Japan, YukioYoneda, Nobuyuki Kuramoto, Koichi Kawada, October 2019
Source

2. The beneficial health effects of green tea amino acid l‐theanine in animal models: Promises and prospects for human trials; Jackson Williams Domenico Sergi Andrew J. McKune Ekavi N. Georgousopoulou Duane D. Mellor Nenad Naumovski, 10 January 2019
Source

3. Caffeine and theanine from cultured cells of Camellia sinensis; Tsutomu Furuya, Yutaka Orihara, Yumiko Tsuda, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kitasato University, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108, Japan, 1990
Source

4. Anti-stress effects of drinking green tea with lowered caffeine and enriched theanine, epigallocatechin and arginine on psychosocial stress induced adrenal hypertrophy in mice; Keiko Unno, Ayane Hara, Aimi Nakagawa, Kazuaki Iguchi, Megumi Ohshio, Akio Morita, Yoriyuki Nakamurac, 15 November 2016
Source

5. Antidiabetic Properties of Green tea Catechins; Ioannis Verginadis, Angelos Evangelou, January 2013
Source

6. GREEN TEA AS A WONDERFUL AND GRATEFUL DRINK FOR PROMOTING HEALTH A.S.Chinchole*, P.V.Waghmare, B.N.Poul, C.V.Panchal, L.V.Sonawane , D.V.Chavan Department of Quality Assurance, Maharashtra College of Pharmacy, Nilanga, Dist. Latur (MS) 413521, India, Jan-Mar 2014
Source

7. Factors that Affect the Body’s Nervous System: Relaxation Effects of Tea L- Theanine; Theertham Pradyumna Rao, Lekh R. Juneja, March 2006
Source

8. Bioactive components of tea: Cancer, inflammation and behavior; Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, Marco Vinicio Ramirez-Mares, Sirima Puangpraphant, August 2009
Source

9. Effects of timing of acute catechin-rich green tea ingestion on postprandial glucose metabolism in healthy men; Masaki Takahashi, Mamiho Ozaki, Masashi Miyashita, Mayuko Fukazaw, Takashi Nakaoka, Takuya Wakisaka, Yuji Matsui, Masanobu Hibi, Noriko Osaki, Shigenobu Shibata, November 2019
Source

10. Blood and urine levels of tea catechins after ingestion of different amounts of green tea by human volunteers; C S Yang, L Chen, M J Lee, D Balentine, M C Kuo and S P Schantz, Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev April 1 1998 (7) (4) 351-354; Published April 1998
Source

11. Nakachi K., Imai K., Suga K. (1997) Epidemiological Evidence for Prevention of Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease by Drinking Green Tea. In: Ohigashi H., Osawa T., Terao J., Watanabe S., Yoshikawa T. (eds) Food Factors for Cancer Prevention. Springer, Tokyo
Source

12. Effects of capsaicin, green tea and CH-19 sweet pepper on appetite and energy intake in humans in negative and positive energy balance; H.C.Reinbach, A.Smeets, T.Martinussen, P.Møller, M.S.Westerterp-Plantenga, June 2009
Source

13. The Healing Power of Tea: Simple Teas & Tisanes to Remedy and Rejuvenate; Caroline Dow, 08.10.2014
Source

Why you can trust us?

Wissenschaftliche Studie
The role of glutamine in neurogenesis promoted by the green tea amino acid theanine in neural progenitor cells for brain health; The Institute of Prophylactic Pharmacology, Kita-Shinagawa, Shinagawa, 140-0001, Tokyo, Japan, YukioYoneda, Nobuyuki Kuramoto, Koichi Kawada, October 2019
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
The beneficial health effects of green tea amino acid l‐theanine in animal models: Promises and prospects for human trials; Jackson Williams Domenico Sergi Andrew J. McKune Ekavi N. Georgousopoulou Duane D. Mellor Nenad Naumovski, 10 January 2019
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Caffeine and theanine from cultured cells of Camellia sinensis; Tsutomu Furuya, Yutaka Orihara, Yumiko Tsuda, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kitasato University, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108, Japan, 1990
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Anti-stress effects of drinking green tea with lowered caffeine and enriched theanine, epigallocatechin and arginine on psychosocial stress induced adrenal hypertrophy in mice; Keiko Unno, Ayane Hara, Aimi Nakagawa, Kazuaki Iguchi, Megumi Ohshio, Akio Morita, Yoriyuki Nakamurac, 15 November 2016
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Antidiabetic Properties of Green tea Catechins; Ioannis Verginadis, Angelos Evangelou, January 2013
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
GREEN TEA AS A WONDERFUL AND GRATEFUL DRINK FOR PROMOTING HEALTH A.S.Chinchole*, P.V.Waghmare, B.N.Poul, C.V.Panchal, L.V.Sonawane , D.V.Chavan Department of Quality Assurance, Maharashtra College of Pharmacy, Nilanga, Dist. Latur (MS) 413521, India, Jan-Mar 2014
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Factors that Affect the Body’s Nervous System: Relaxation Effects of Tea L- Theanine; Theertham Pradyumna Rao, Lekh R. Juneja, March 2006
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Bioactive components of tea: Cancer, inflammation and behavior; Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, Marco Vinicio Ramirez-Mares, Sirima Puangpraphant, August 2009
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Effects of timing of acute catechin-rich green tea ingestion on postprandial glucose metabolism in healthy men; Masaki Takahashi, Mamiho Ozaki, Masashi Miyashita, Mayuko Fukazaw, Takashi Nakaoka, Takuya Wakisaka, Yuji Matsui, Masanobu Hibi, Noriko Osaki, Shigenobu Shibata, November 2019
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Blood and urine levels of tea catechins after ingestion of different amounts of green tea by human volunteers; C S Yang, L Chen, M J Lee, D Balentine, M C Kuo and S P Schantz, Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev April 1 1998 (7) (4) 351-354; Published April 1998
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Nakachi K., Imai K., Suga K. (1997) Epidemiological Evidence for Prevention of Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease by Drinking Green Tea. In: Ohigashi H., Osawa T., Terao J., Watanabe S., Yoshikawa T. (eds) Food Factors for Cancer Prevention. Springer, Tokyo
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Effects of capsaicin, green tea and CH-19 sweet pepper on appetite and energy intake in humans in negative and positive energy balance; H.C.Reinbach, A.Smeets, T.Martinussen, P.Møller, M.S.Westerterp-Plantenga, June 2009
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
The Healing Power of Tea: Simple Teas & Tisanes to Remedy and Rejuvenate; Caroline Dow, 08.10.2014
Go to source
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