Last updated: August 11, 2021

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Even in the Middle Ages, mystical stories surrounded mandrake, also known as mandragora. The plant was said to have special healing powers against depression, lack of sleep and much more. You want to try mandrake yourself or wonder how much of it is true? Here you can find out about the treatment, effects and buying criteria for mandrake.

We are pleased that you have found your way here. In this big mandrake test 2021 you will get all the answers to your questions. We will provide you with scientific background information on this special plant and advise you on whether and how mandrake could help you.




The most important

  • Mandrakes are shade plants that have been used as a medicinal plant since the Middle Ages.
  • It is said to have special physical effects. For example, it is used as a relaxing and pain-relieving remedy.
  • Mandrake is highly poisonous and must be treated and dosed with care.

Mandrake: Our Selection

If you are looking for a suitable homeopathic remedy for you, we have put together a few suggestions here.

Buying and evaluation criteria for mandrake products

There are many different ways to buy mandrake products online and in pharmacies. In this section, we will show you what to look for when buying mandrake and help you find the right product.

Form of administration

Mandrake is offered as a remedy in various forms. Which form you should choose depends on your preferences.

Mandrake is most often found in tablet form. The tablets can be sucked or swallowed in small pieces. Here, the potency number varies across the whole spectrum from D4-D12.

The dosages and potency indices can be very dependent on the form in which it is taken.

In liquid form, mandrake is usually available in a strong dilution and in handy vials in the pharmacy. The most widespread index of the dilution is D12 and thus a rather harmless variant.

Another way to use mandrake is as an ointment. This can act directly on the affected areas of the body and, for example, have its potential pain-relieving effect.

Taking it in powder form is considered outdated. Difficult to dose, this used to be administered directly only by doctors. Today, mandrake is no longer available in powder form as a remedy.

Dosage

When dosing your remedy, always pay attention to the package leaflet. How much you should take depends on the form of administration and the potency index.

For globule pills, the dosages for a potency number of D12 for adults are between 5-10 pieces per day. This weak dosage is very strongly diluted and accordingly a high intake number is possible without becoming dangerous.

Tablets with potency numbers below D8 should be handled with special care. It is best to ask your doctor or pharmacist what the ideal dosage would be.

Diluted variants are measured in drops or teaspoons. Here you should be able to read the appropriate dosage for your age and weight on the accompanying package leaflet.

Potency index

The potency index tells you how much diluted a remedy is. This essentially means that the mandrake substance used is mixed with water or alcohol and can thus develop a homeopathic effect without having a dangerous effect.

The lowest defined dilution is D1 with a ratio of 1:10. There is no limit upwards. The categories increase according to the principle D2 is 1:10², D3 is 1:10³ and so on.

Remedies from mandrake are available from potency code D4. Half a litre of diluent comes to one drop of mandrake. Furthermore, liquid medicines made from mandrake go up to D12.

Package sizes

As with most medicines and remedies, there are standardised size quantities in which mandrake is available. The sizes in which you can buy the various forms of intake can be seen in the following table.

  • Globules: 10 or 20g in vials
  • Tablets: 80 or 200 pieces in a pack
  • Vials: single 1ml doses up to 50ml vials

Some of the medicines are freely available on the internet and some you have to buy at your local pharmacy. As a homeopathic remedy, almost all packs are available without a prescription.

Guide: Frequently asked questions about mandrake answered in detail

There are many questions about mandrake. We have tried to collect the most important ones and answer them for you in this guide.

What is mandrake and how does it work?

Mandrake, also called mandragora, is a plant genus from the nightshade family. The active ingredients such as atropine, hyoscyamine, scopolamine, cuscohygrin and apoatropine are obtained by grinding or burning the plant. (1)

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Mandrake is mainly used in the root. However, the leaves and flowers also have effective ingredients.
(Image source: Erik Llerena / Pixabay)

Atropine and scopolamine in particular have an anticholinergic effect and can have a relaxing effect on the smooth muscles and thus be used specifically. (2) In addition, it has additional potential effects such as drowsiness and fatigue.

In too large doses, mandrake can have dangerous effects.

States of confusion, memory loss, headaches and nausea are then no longer uncommon. We will explain more about the poisonous side of this plant in a coming section.

When and for whom is a treatment with mandrake useful?

The remedies made from mandrake are suitable for several ailments. Among others, anxious and restless people could benefit from the potentially relaxing effect. This effect could also partially help with depression and other psychological complaints. The calming function can be attributed to the substances it contains, atropine and scopolamine. (2) (8)

The additional anaesthetic effect of scopolamine may theoretically be helpful for mild physical complaints. (3) Here, the dosage must be followed exactly and caution is advised, as a mild pleasant anaesthetic can quickly develop into a dangerous condition. With the globule preparations, such strong effects are excluded in principle.

Since nowadays the majority of remedies made from mandrake are only sold and used in homeopathic doses and as globules, it takes a certain amount of faith in homeopathy.

The small amounts taken alone cannot have the full effect. A certain psychological effect that comes with your faith in this alternative medicine is ultimately inevitable, as there are no studies that prove the direct effect of mandrake in globules on the human body.

What types of mandrake products are there and which one is right for you?

Mandrake is divided into three different types. These are the Himalayan mandrake, the common mandrake and the Turkmen mandrake. In the following you can read about the differences.

Species Description
Himalayan mandrake This species gets its name from its origin. The plant from the Himalayan mountains contains scopolamine and anisodamine, which can be used medicinally.
Common mandrake The common mandrake from the Mediterranean region is the best-known medicinal plant. With a long cultural-historical tradition, the use of its healing properties is proven to date back to the Middle Ages.
Turkmen mandrake As an edible mandrake, it is very popular in some regions of Iran and is liked for its aromatic taste. In Turkmenistan it is also known as a medicinal plant.

The common mandrake is an ingredient in almost all medicines that can be bought.

Which parts of the mandrake plant are used?

Basically, the active ingredients are extracted from leaves, fruits and barks. Most medicines, however, are made from the root. This is harvested after bearing fruit, cut and dried for further processing.

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Mandrake must first be processed before it can be taken in dosable quantities.
(Image source: Angelo Rosa / Pixabay)

In the Turkmen regions, the widespread species is used as food. Some of the leaves and berries are harvested in their own gardens. However, this is associated with a risk, as the Turkmen mandrake can also be poisonous.

What side effects can mandrake products have?

Taking mandrake in higher doses can sometimes lead to severe side effects. Caution is therefore advised if you decide to use this remedy.

The side effects that could occur include:(4)

  • Confusion
  • dry mouth
  • Heart problems
  • Impaired vision
  • overheating
  • Hallucinations

You should also avoid using mandrake if you are pregnant, under the age of majority or old. Furthermore, if you have problems in the following areas(4)

  • Liver
  • Heart
  • High blood pressure
  • Passing urine
  • swollen prostate

Is mandrake poisonous to me?

You should never consume mandrake improperly. In the worst case, this can result in fatal intoxication.(5)

Caution: Mandrakes are toxic plants.

The fruit of the Turkmen mandrake is only safe in its fully matured form, so if you are not familiar with it, it is best not to eat it.

But for your peace of mind: The highly diluted homeopathic tablets and dilutions are harmless as long as you stick to the prescribed dosages. You can reliably find these in the package leaflet.

What are the alternatives to mandrake products?

The toxicity of mandrake can understandably make it a little less popular. However, there are many alternatives for this plant and its effects. Since mandrake is used for various ailments, category-specific alternatives can help.

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Mandrakes are available in many different formats, for example as a dilution.
(Image source: monicore / Pixabay)

For sleep problems and nervous disorders, or when a relaxing effect is desired, valerian proves to be an ideal option. Studies have shown that the substance lignan binds to the same receptors as the sleep hormone melatonin(6)

Cloves can help out with the analgesic effect of mandrake. (7) The miracle plant helps against toothache and many other ailments and is available everywhere.

Image source: Alraune / 123rf

References (8)

1. Hanus, Lumir & Řezanka, Tomáš & Spízek, Jaroslav & Dembitsky, Valery. (2005). Substances Isolated from Mandragora Species. Phytochemistry. 66. 2408-17. 10.1016/j.phytochem.2005.07.016.
Source

2. P. Abrams, L. Cardozo, S. Khouri, A. Wein: Pharmacological treatment of urinary incontinence. 3rd International Consultation on Incontinence. Edition 2005, S. 822–826.
Source

3. Mou, Kanzil & Parvin, Most & Dash, Pritesh. (2020). Phytochemistry and medicinal properties of Mandragora officinarum: A review. 1. 05-09.
Source

4. Auflistung der Nebeneffekte von Mandragora.
Source

5. Andreas Alberts, Peter Mullen: Psychoaktive Pflanzen, Pilze und Tiere. Kosmos, Stuttgart 2006, ISBN 3-440-10749-3.
Source

6. Choi HS, Ko BS, Kim HD, Hong KB, Suh HJ. Effect of Valerian/Hop Mixture on Sleep-Related Behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster. Biol Pharm Bull. 2017;40(7):1101-1110. doi: 10.1248/bpb.b17-00262 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28674253/
Source

7. Alqareer A, Alyahya A, Andersson L. The effect of clove and benzocaine versus placebo as topical anesthetics. J Dent. 2006 Nov;34(10):747-50. doi: 10.1016/j.jdent.2006.01.009. Epub 2006 Mar 13. PMID: 16530911.
Source

8. M. Wentzel: Über die chemischen Bestandteile der Mandragorawurzel. Dissertation, Berlin 1900.
Source

Why you can trust me?

Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Hanus, Lumir & Řezanka, Tomáš & Spízek, Jaroslav & Dembitsky, Valery. (2005). Substances Isolated from Mandragora Species. Phytochemistry. 66. 2408-17. 10.1016/j.phytochem.2005.07.016.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
P. Abrams, L. Cardozo, S. Khouri, A. Wein: Pharmacological treatment of urinary incontinence. 3rd International Consultation on Incontinence. Edition 2005, S. 822–826.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Mou, Kanzil & Parvin, Most & Dash, Pritesh. (2020). Phytochemistry and medicinal properties of Mandragora officinarum: A review. 1. 05-09.
Go to source
Online Artikel
Auflistung der Nebeneffekte von Mandragora.
Go to source
Fachliteratur
Andreas Alberts, Peter Mullen: Psychoaktive Pflanzen, Pilze und Tiere. Kosmos, Stuttgart 2006, ISBN 3-440-10749-3.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Choi HS, Ko BS, Kim HD, Hong KB, Suh HJ. Effect of Valerian/Hop Mixture on Sleep-Related Behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster. Biol Pharm Bull. 2017;40(7):1101-1110. doi: 10.1248/bpb.b17-00262 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28674253/
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Alqareer A, Alyahya A, Andersson L. The effect of clove and benzocaine versus placebo as topical anesthetics. J Dent. 2006 Nov;34(10):747-50. doi: 10.1016/j.jdent.2006.01.009. Epub 2006 Mar 13. PMID: 16530911.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Lektüre
M. Wentzel: Über die chemischen Bestandteile der Mandragorawurzel. Dissertation, Berlin 1900.
Go to source
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