Last updated: August 6, 2021

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Everyone knows at least one person who has problems sleeping. The hormone melatonin plays a central role in regulating our sleep-wake rhythm. Thus, people with sleep disorders often suffer from a deficiency of this important endogenous hormone. Melatonin can be taken as an active ingredient to counteract such problems. With our 10 mg melatonin test 2021 we want to give you all the relevant information about the active ingredient melatonin. Melatonin is available in various forms and dosages, including the maximum dosage of 10 mg. We will show you all the important aspects of melatonin in the following.




First of all, the most important things

  • Melatonin is a hormone produced naturally in the body that regulates our sleep-wake rhythm. For people with sleep disorders, taking melatonin as an active ingredient can help to counteract them.
  • Melatonin as an active ingredient is available in various forms and dosages. You can choose between tablets, capsules, sprays and creams. The dosages range from 0.1 mg to 10 mg, the latter being the maximum dose.
  • From a dosage of 2 mg, melatonin as an active ingredient is subject to prescription. Up to 2 mg melatonin dosages count as a food supplement and do not require a prescription from a doctor to purchase.

Best Melatonin 10mg: Our Picks

Buying and evaluation criteria for products with 10 mg melatonin

There are certain criteria you should look for when buying products with 10 mg melatonin:

These criteria can help you make your choice. Since this is a product that is only available on prescription in Germany, you should pay close attention to what your doctor recommends. If you are interested in melatonin as a food supplement, you should inform yourself well in advance.

Dosage form

Melatonin is available in many different forms. The substance can be taken in the form of tablets, capsules, sprays or creams. Depending on the form of administration, however, there are different dosages that you should pay attention to. The dosage of 10 mg melatonin is available in each of these dosage forms. It is up to you to decide which dosage form you prefer and which you do not like. In addition, the time of effect can also differ depending on the dosage form.

Tablets and capsules in particular can take up to 2 hours to take effect.

Dosage

A dosage of 10 mg is the maximum recommended melatonin dose per day. However, as the dosage can vary greatly between different products and different dosage forms, you should inform yourself well in advance about your preferred product. In addition to the maximum dosage of 10 mg, smaller dosages are also possible for daily use. These often start at 0.1 mg. The promised effect of melatonin increases with the dosage. For example, the maximum dose of 10 mg melatonin usually shows a relatively strong effect and can therefore be very helpful in combating massive sleep problems.

Each person reacts differently to the different doses. So it is best to start with a smaller dosage first.

Ingredients

Often, products with 10 mg of melatonin also contain many other ingredients, such as vitamin D or vitamin C. These can be ingredients that help you sleep. These may be ingredients that have effects other than melatonin. In this way, the manufacturers want to offer you an all-encompassing product. However, they can also be ingredients that have a similar effect to melatonin.

Inform yourself in advance about the ingredients contained in the product.

However, you should check in advance whether the different ingredients are relevant for you. Just because a product contains many different ingredients does not mean that the product will be more effective. In fact, the effect of some ingredients is not sufficiently scientifically proven and only pushes up the price of the product.

Manufacturer

There are many different manufacturers of 10 mg melatonin on the market. Before you buy, you should make sure that the manufacturer is a qualified and reputable one. Some manufacturers are not very good in terms of quality. They offer their products with promises that they cannot keep. Also, the list of ingredients may not be true and may mislead you. With the maximum dosage of 10 mg, you should pay special attention to the manufacturer.

Guide: Frequently asked questions about 10 mg melatonin answered in detail

In the next sections we will describe the effectiveness of melatonin and the current state of science in more detail. For this purpose, we have summarised all relevant information on the topic of 10 mg melatonin.

What is 10 mg melatonin and how does it work?

Melatonin is a hormone produced naturally in the body, mainly in the pineal gland (epiphysis) in the brain. The hormone is responsible for regulating our sleep-wake rhythm. In daylight, the production of melatonin is inhibited and at night, the secretion is driven.

10 mg Melatonin-1

Melatonin regulates our sleep, which is why it is often called the "sleep hormone".
(Image source: Gregory Pappas / unsplash)

So melatonin plays a very important role in regulating our sleep. But this particular hormone is very versatile and can have positive effects in other places as well.

Effects on sleep disorders and drowsiness

Just how important melatonin is for us humans is shown by what results from a deficiency of this hormone. People with a melatonin deficiency very often suffer from sleep disorders and drowsiness (1). Melatonin is also available as an active ingredient that can counteract these problems. The dosage of 10 mg is the strongest recommended dosage and is therefore very effective. It ensures that the melatonin balance in the body is quickly restored. This allows enough melatonin to be distributed in the blood and signals to our body that it needs to rest.

Antioxidant effect against ageing

In addition to its supportive effect on sleep disorders and drowsiness, 10 mg melatonin can also be very helpful against ageing. With age, the number of free radicals in our body increases. These are known to attack and destroy our cells. So the organic compounds of free radicals contribute to the ageing of us humans. The hormone melatonin can bind these and thereby prevent the free radicals from attacking our cells. A melatonin dosage of 10 mg ensures that the melatonin balance in our body is increased. Taking 10 mg of melatonin can therefore increase the likelihood of melatonin binding to the free radicals. If this is the case, 10 mg melatonin may also have an anti-ageing effect (2).

When and for whom is it useful to take 10 mg melatonin?

In general, taking the maximum dosage of 10 mg melatonin makes sense for people for whom a lower dose has hardly shown any effect. So people who suffer particularly badly from sleep disorders should consider using this high dosage. In addition to using melatonin to combat sleep disorders, the active ingredient can also be helpful for jet lag, senior citizens or shift workers.
Reason Effect
Jetlag Insomnia and daytime sleepiness after long journeys can be counteracted by taking melatonin. It can help you synchronise your sleep-wake cycle (3).
Seniors With age, the production of melatonin decreases, which means that older people often suffer from sleep problems due to a melatonin deficiency. Here, taking melatonin can help restore normal sleep (4).
Shift workers Taking melatonin can also be helpful for people who work long and or nights. The active ingredient can support and restore disturbed sleep rhythms (5).

So melatonin can be useful for people in different conditions. But pregnant women or women who want to become pregnant should refrain from taking melatonin (6).

Is 10 mg melatonin available without a prescription?

Melatonin as a pure medicinal product is only available in Germany from a dose of 2 mg with a prescription from a doctor. So you can only get the medicine if it has been prescribed for you. However, you can buy melatonin as a food supplement without a prescription. In this case, a dose of up to 2 mg counts as a food supplement, so it can be bought without a doctor's prescription.

What are the side effects of taking 10 mg of melatonin?

Like all active substances, taking melatonin can have certain side effects in the short term. Although the following side effects are repeatedly mentioned in connection with melatonin, it can be said that there are few scientific findings on long-term side effects (7, 8).

  • Irritability and nervousness
  • Headaches, migraines
  • Weight gain
  • Sleepiness (lethargy)
  • increased blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Dizziness

The various side effects are therefore very unlikely to occur, if at all. Nevertheless, you should always take a look at the package leaflet before taking melatonin or ask your doctor for advice.

How should melatonin be dosed?

In general, it can be said that the dosage depends on the tolerance of the active ingredient melatonin for your body and the intensity of your complaints. It is advisable to start with a lower dose such as 0.3 mg for the first use. If there is no effect, the dose can be increased.

10 mg Melatonin-2

Many people suffer from sleep disorders. Melatonin as an active ingredient can help to solve these problems.
(Image source: Matheus Vinicius / unsplash)

Make sure that you take the active ingredient after your last meal and before going to bed. However, the issue of dosage needs a little more research, as the scientific situation is somewhat insufficient here.

Where does natural melatonin occur?

Melatonin occurs naturally in certain places. Not only is it synthesised by the human body, but certain plants also produce the valuable hormone.

  • Body: Melatonin is a hormone produced naturally in the body, mainly by the pineal gland (epiphysis) in the brain. In addition to the pineal gland, melatonin is also synthesised to a lesser extent in certain parts of the gut and retina.
  • Plants: Melatonin has also been found in certain plants. These include various herbs, seeds and fruits. For example, melatonin has been found in the skin of certain red grapes (9).

So melatonin is not only responsible for the sleep rhythm in humans. Certain plants also benefit from this special substance.

What types of melatonin are there as an active ingredient?

There are now a lot of different types of melatonin as an active ingredient. The types can be determined by their dosage form. The most common forms of melatonin as an active ingredient are tablets, capsules, sprays and creams.

Melatonin Tabletten

The most common dosage forms of melatonin as an active ingredient are tablets and capsules. (Image source: Elsa Olofsson/ unsplash)

The different forms of administration each have certain advantages and disadvantages, which we would like to compare in the following table.

  • Tablets / capsules: Melatonin in the form of tablets or capsules have no taste of their own and can be swallowed normally with water.
  • Spray: The melatonin spray is one of the newer forms of administration. Here, the melatonin is sprayed directly into the mouth.
  • Cream: Creams containing melatonin are simply applied to the skin and thus absorbed by the skin.

In the following, we would like to introduce you to the individual types and show you their advantages and disadvantages.

Tablets / capsules

Melatonin in the form of tablets and capsules is available in different sizes and quantities. There is also a large selection, which means that melatonin tablets and melatonin capsules are easily available and also relatively inexpensive.

Advantages
  • large selection
  • exact dosage
  • relatively inexpensive
Disadvantages
  • no direct effect
  • application unpleasant for some people

Melatonin tablets and melatonin capsules should be taken up to 2 hours before bedtime as they need a certain amount of time to take effect. Their dosage is quite accurate, so you can keep your desired dose very well.

Spray

The melatonin spray is easy to use. As it takes effect relatively quickly, it can simply be sprayed into the mouth at the desired time. This way, the melatonin is absorbed directly by the mucous membranes.

Advantages
  • easy to use
  • quick effect
Disadvantages
  • ambiguous dosage
  • relatively high price

Although a dose of 0.125 mg per spray is given, the dosage is not as clear as with melatonin tablets. The price of sprays containing melatonin is also relatively high.

Cream

The melatonin-containing cream can simply be applied to the skin. This way, the hormone melatonin is mainly absorbed through the skin and is thus very effective (10).

Advantages
  • easy to apply
  • highly effective
Disadvantages
  • difficult to dose
  • relatively high price(SOURCE)

However, it is difficult to follow the dosage with a cream. Since melatonin-containing creams are still relatively new, they are not exactly inexpensive. Nevertheless, using a melatonin-containing cream is not dangerous (11).

Where can I buy products with 10 mg melatonin?

Products with 10 mg melatonin can be purchased in various ways. For example, melatonin as a medicine with a dosage of 2 mg or more requires a prescription in Germany and can be bought at any pharmacy with a doctor's prescription.
Type price range
Tablets / capsules 6 to 45 €
Spray 11 to 50 €
Cream 17 to 80 €

In some countries, however, the medicine can be obtained without a doctor's prescription. It is also allowed to bring such a medicine from abroad. All medicines containing melatonin can also be purchased from abroad on the internet. It is not permitted to obtain foreign melatonin as a medicinal product in Germany. However, up to a dosage of 2 mg, melatonin is considered a food supplement and can be bought without a prescription. You can buy this dosage not only in normal pharmacies but also on the internet at all online shops like medpex.de or shop-apotheke.com.

What are the alternatives to 10 mg melatonin?

First of all, 10 mg melatonin is a specific dosage of the active ingredient. Accordingly, melatonin is also available in other dosages that are an alternative to the 10 mg dosage. Besides the active ingredient melatonin itself, there are also other alternative active ingredients to counteract sleep disorders.

  • Valerian (12)
  • Hops (13)
  • various sleeping pills (e.g. diphenhydramine and doxylamine)

The active ingredients listed have a similar effect to melatonin. They are calming and cause all of the body's activities to be somewhat reduced. This means that nothing stands in the way of a better night's sleep.

Image source: Golub / 123rf

References (13)

1. Niestroj, I. (2000). Praxis der Orthomolekularen Medizin (2. Aufl.). Stuttgart , Deutschland: Hippokrates.
Source

2. Rodriguez, C., Mayo, J. C., Sainz, R. M., Antolín, I., Herrera, F., Martín, V., & Reiter, R. J. (2004). Regulation of antioxidant enzymes: a significant role for melatonin. Journal of pineal research, 36(1), 1-9.
Source

3. Herxheimer, A., & Petrie, K. J. (2002). Melatonin for the prevention and treatment of jet lag. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, (2), CD001520. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD001520
Source

4. Lyseng-Williamson K. A. (2012). Melatonin prolonged release: in the treatment of insomnia in patients aged ≥55 years. Drugs & aging, 29(11), 911–923. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40266-012-0018-z
Source

5. Razavi, P., Devore, E. E., Bajaj, A., Lockley, S. W., Figueiro, M. G., Ricchiuti, V., Gauderman, W. J., Hankinson, S. E., Willett, W. C., & Schernhammer, E. S. (2019). Shift Work, Chronotype, and Melatonin Rhythm in Nurses. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 28(7), 1177–1186. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-1018
Source

6. Andersen, L. P., Gögenur, I., Rosenberg, J., & Reiter, R. J. (2016). The Safety of Melatonin in Humans. Clinical drug investigation, 36(3), 169–175. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40261-015-0368-5
Source

7. Andersen, L.P.H., Gögenur, I., Rosenberg, J. et al. (2016). The Safety of Melatonin in Humans. Clin Drug Investig 36, 169–175. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40261-015-0368-5
Source

8. Costello, R. B., Lentino, C. V., Boyd, C. C., O'Connell, M. L., Crawford, C. C., Sprengel, M. L., & Deuster, P. A. (2014). The effectiveness of melatonin for promoting healthy sleep: a rapid evidence assessment of the literature. Nutrition journal, 13, 106. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-13-106
Source

9. Iriti, M., Rossoni, M. and Faoro, F. (2006), Melatonin content in grape: myth or panacea?. J. Sci. Food Agric., 86: 1432-1438. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.2537
Source

10. Fischer T, W, Greif C, Fluhr J, W, Wigger-Alberti W, Elsner P (2004). Percutaneous Penetration of Topically Applied Melatonin in a Cream and an Alcoholic Solution. Skin Pharmacol Physiol ;17:190-194. doi: 10.1159/000078822
Source

11. Shohei Nishimon, Mari Nishimon, Seiji Nishino. (2019) Tasimelteon for treating non-24-h sleep-wake rhythm disorder. Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 20:9, pages 1065-1073.
Source

12. Bent, S., Padula, A., Moore, D., Patterson, M., & Mehling, W. (2006). Valerian for sleep: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American journal of medicine, 119(12), 1005–1012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.02.026
Source

13. Franco, L., Sánchez, C., Bravo, R., Rodriguez, A., Barriga, C., & Juánez, J. C. (2012). The sedative effects of hops (Humulus lupulus), a component of beer, on the activity/rest rhythm. Acta physiologica Hungarica, 99(2), 133–139. https://doi.org/10.1556/APhysiol.99.2012.2.6
Source

Why you can trust me?

Wissenschaftliches Lehrbuch
Niestroj, I. (2000). Praxis der Orthomolekularen Medizin (2. Aufl.). Stuttgart , Deutschland: Hippokrates.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Rodriguez, C., Mayo, J. C., Sainz, R. M., Antolín, I., Herrera, F., Martín, V., & Reiter, R. J. (2004). Regulation of antioxidant enzymes: a significant role for melatonin. Journal of pineal research, 36(1), 1-9.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Herxheimer, A., & Petrie, K. J. (2002). Melatonin for the prevention and treatment of jet lag. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, (2), CD001520. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD001520
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Lyseng-Williamson K. A. (2012). Melatonin prolonged release: in the treatment of insomnia in patients aged ≥55 years. Drugs & aging, 29(11), 911–923. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40266-012-0018-z
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Razavi, P., Devore, E. E., Bajaj, A., Lockley, S. W., Figueiro, M. G., Ricchiuti, V., Gauderman, W. J., Hankinson, S. E., Willett, W. C., & Schernhammer, E. S. (2019). Shift Work, Chronotype, and Melatonin Rhythm in Nurses. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 28(7), 1177–1186. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-1018
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Andersen, L. P., Gögenur, I., Rosenberg, J., & Reiter, R. J. (2016). The Safety of Melatonin in Humans. Clinical drug investigation, 36(3), 169–175. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40261-015-0368-5
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Andersen, L.P.H., Gögenur, I., Rosenberg, J. et al. (2016). The Safety of Melatonin in Humans. Clin Drug Investig 36, 169–175. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40261-015-0368-5
Go to source
Systematische Review
Costello, R. B., Lentino, C. V., Boyd, C. C., O'Connell, M. L., Crawford, C. C., Sprengel, M. L., & Deuster, P. A. (2014). The effectiveness of melatonin for promoting healthy sleep: a rapid evidence assessment of the literature. Nutrition journal, 13, 106. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-13-106
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Iriti, M., Rossoni, M. and Faoro, F. (2006), Melatonin content in grape: myth or panacea?. J. Sci. Food Agric., 86: 1432-1438. https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.2537
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Fischer T, W, Greif C, Fluhr J, W, Wigger-Alberti W, Elsner P (2004). Percutaneous Penetration of Topically Applied Melatonin in a Cream and an Alcoholic Solution. Skin Pharmacol Physiol ;17:190-194. doi: 10.1159/000078822
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Shohei Nishimon, Mari Nishimon, Seiji Nishino. (2019) Tasimelteon for treating non-24-h sleep-wake rhythm disorder. Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 20:9, pages 1065-1073.
Go to source
Metaanalyse
Bent, S., Padula, A., Moore, D., Patterson, M., & Mehling, W. (2006). Valerian for sleep: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American journal of medicine, 119(12), 1005–1012. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.02.026
Go to source
Experimentelle Studie
Franco, L., Sánchez, C., Bravo, R., Rodriguez, A., Barriga, C., & Juánez, J. C. (2012). The sedative effects of hops (Humulus lupulus), a component of beer, on the activity/rest rhythm. Acta physiologica Hungarica, 99(2), 133–139. https://doi.org/10.1556/APhysiol.99.2012.2.6
Go to source
Reviews