Last updated: October 18, 2021

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In this country, seaweed is hardly used at all, but in Asia it is quite different.

They have always known that seaweed is an ideal source of vitamins, minerals and trace elements. And this knowledge is slowly but surely arriving here, because seaweed is definitely a superfood that we should all integrate more into our everyday lives.

We are pleased that you have found your way to our great seaweed powder test 2021. We will give you all the information you need about seaweed. You will not only learn why the plant is said to have healing effects, but also learn something about the plant itself.




Summary

  • Seaweed powder clearly belongs to the so-called superfoods, as it contains numerous vitamins, minerals and trace elements.
  • There are countless types of seaweed and more and more healing ingredients are being discovered in research. However, it still takes time until these are fully researched.
  • Seaweed has a strong taste of its own. For this reason, you should find out beforehand whether you like it or not, as this will strongly influence your purchase decision regarding the form.

The Best Seaweed Powder: Our Picks

Buying and evaluation criteria for seaweed powder

When buying seaweed powder, you can pay attention to various aspects, such as:

By making the right choice for you, you can save money and also make sure that you don't give your body anything it doesn't need. Therefore, always look for high quality and ask to see the manufacturer's certificates if necessary.

Quality

As with any other food or supplement, it is essential to pay attention to high quality, because you are feeding it to your body.

The first and most important criterion is quality.

When we talk about quality when it comes to seaweed powder, it is first and foremost about making sure that the seaweed is certified organic. Another quality feature is that the product is free of other additives.

For allergy sufferers and people with intolerances, it is also very important to make sure that the products are free of gluten and/or lactose.

Form

After you have decided on a high-quality product, the next important decision is - in what form do you want to consume your seaweed product?

Here you have a choice of three options: powder, capsules or dried. This decision depends on your preferences for consuming supplements. If you like to drink it or mix it with smoothies, then powder will be the right choice.

However, if you are someone who likes them dosed quickly and to the milligram, then capsules are optimal. And if you prefer them as a snack between meals, then you should go for the dried form.

Water solubility

The water solubility or solubility of a substance indicates how well it dissolves in solvents.

This point is especially important for powder.

This means that the better a substance dissolves, the better it can be absorbed. And the better it can be absorbed, the more vitamins, minerals and trace elements enter our circulation and can be used by our body.

Guide: Frequently asked questions about seaweed powder answered in detail

In order to inform you comprehensively about the effectiveness of seaweed and to give you an understanding of the current state of science, we have summarised all the important information in the following sections.

What is seaweed powder and how does it work?

Seaweed has always been used in Asian cuisine. Especially in Japan, a lot of seaweed is consumed and is one of the reasons why the Japanese have the highest life expectancy.

In this country they are mostly only known from sushi.

One effect of seaweed is that it slows down the ageing process. They also strengthen the immune system.

In the meantime, their detoxifying effect has also been discovered, which should be known to most people due to the detox trend.

The expected effect of seaweed is due to the following ingredients:

  • Minerals such as iron, magnesium and iodine
  • Vitamins A, C, E and folic acid
  • Trace elements like zinc and selenium (1)

Detoxification of the body

It is no secret that mankind is living more and more wastefully and that industry and agriculture have grown more and more as a result. But this growth has polluted our environment with countless environmental toxins and heavy metals. In alternative healing approaches, these contaminations are seen as the cause of many diseases, which is why they advise detoxification.

Chlorella algae in particular are said to have a particularly good detox effect.

This is because it binds heavy metals from the waters in which it lives due to the structure of its cell membrane. (2)

However, studies on the detox effect of chlorella have mainly been conducted on mice, rats or in the test tube. So far, however, only a few studies have been conducted on humans. But those that have been conducted so far tend to show that the chlorella alga does indeed have a detoxifying effect.(3)

Relief from osteoarthritis

As we know, people are getting older and older, and with age the possible diseases also increase. One of these is the joint disease osteoarthritis or arthritis. These two diseases mostly occur in the knees, hips and fingers and until now one could only fight the symptoms and the last resort would be to have an artificial joint inserted.

Now, however, researchers have discovered that a species of brown algae contains a polysaccharide that resembles certain molecules in human cartilage tissue. In previous experiments, it reduced oxidative stress and also suppressed the inflammatory reaction. Unfortunately, this has only been studied in cell cultures in the laboratory so far, so arthrosis/arthritis patients will have to be patient for a while yet.(4)

Strengthening the immune system

For this reason, they provide important components for a healthy and intact immune system. They also provide you with nutrients that you don't easily get from other foods.(5)

Seaweed has one of the widest ranges of minerals and minerals found in the sea. They also contain a variety of plant nutrients and vitamins.

In addition, scientific interest in algae is growing. Research teams are particularly interested in the anti-cancer effects of seaweed. Initial research suggests that algae extracts reduce the risk of colon cancer and other forms of cancer. However, there is still much need for research in this area.(6)

Which parts of the plant are processed by seaweed?

Seaweed consists of four parts. The algae body is called the thallus and is attached to the substrate by the rhizoid, a root-like adhesive organ. The so-called cauloid forms out of the rhizoid. This is the stable and flexible stem of the kelp. This stem has leaf-like fronds, the phylloids.

The kelp powder is also made from these fronds and they are also responsible for photosynthesis. Another interesting fact is that algae reproduce through spores in spore clusters.(7)

Which algae species are there?

In total, there are about 40,000 different species of algae, 20,000 of which are diatoms. However, not all of them are suitable for consumption. However, below you will find a list of algae species that you can eat or that you may have already eaten:

  • Wakame, nori, kombu and hijiki. These types of algae are especially popular in Asian cuisine. Wakame is a big hit when it comes to salads, and nori is the type of algae you've probably eaten if you like sushi.
  • Chlorella and spirulina. These two types of algae are usually mentioned together because they are both considered superfoods. As explained before, they strengthen the immune system.
  • Brown algae or kelp. Kelp contains a lot of iodine, which is why it is ideal for compensating for such a deficiency.(8)

Seetangpulver-1

There are countless types of algae. What many people may not know is that they occur in both salt water and fresh water.
(Image source: unsplash / Silas Baisch)

When and for whom is it useful to take seaweed products?

Basically, taking seaweed products makes sense for everyone. Seaweed products have a very good vitamin, mineral and trace element profile.

But here too, it's the quantity that makes the poison. As with all other superfoods, or food in general, you should take care to consume them in moderation. This is especially important with algae, as they have a high iodine content and excessive consumption can cause side effects.(9)

What types of seaweed powder are there?

Since seaweed has a strong flavour of its own, it comes in different varieties. Depending on whether you like the taste or not, you have the option to choose from different variations. You can see these different forms in the table below.

Type Description
Powder Algae in powder form are mostly combined with smoothies, as you don't really notice their own taste that way.
Capsules Capsules are the easiest way to consume seaweed. They are also so easy to dose and you don't taste them.
dried Dried seaweed is for those who like the taste. For example, you can use them with moderation as a substitute for crisps or simply enjoy them in sushi.

How should seaweed powder be dosed?

Seaweed contains a high amount of iodine. In principle, one should not consume more than 2 to 5 milligrams of iodine per day. Since there is no obligation to indicate the amount of iodine on the packaging and the types of algae contain different amounts of iodine, you can orientate yourself on the fact that you should not consume more than 1 gram of algae per day.(10)

What alternatives are there to seaweed?

As you have already heard, seaweed has numerous vitamins, minerals and trace elements. Nuts and berries are particularly suitable for absorbing the vitamins in a different way.

Seetangpulver-2

Seaweed provides you with countless nutrients. However, pulses and nuts are also a great alternative.
(Image source: unsplash / Maddi Bazzocco)

Pulses, on the other hand, provide you with a lot of minerals, and eggs and pumpkin seeds, for example, provide you with optimal trace elements.(11)

Image source: Maxwell/ 123rf.com

References (11)

1. Algen: Algen - Vielfalt aus dem Meer. (2020, Juni 25). BZfE. https://www.bzfe.de/inhalt/algen-556.html
Source

2. Kumar RM, Frankilin J, Raj SP. Accumulation of heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Pb and Cd) in freshwater micro algae (Chlorella sp.). J Environ Sci Eng. 2013 Jul;55(3):371-6. PMID: 25509955.
Source

3. Lee I, Tran M, Evans-Nguyen T, Stickle D, Kim S, Han J, Park JY, Yang M. Detoxification of chlorella supplement on heterocyclic amines in Korean young adults. Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2015 Jan;39(1):441-6. doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2014.11.015. Epub 2014 Dec 3. PMID: 25590673.
Source

4. gesundu.de. (2017, September 6). Mit Algen Arthritis heilen? https://www.gesundu.de/gesundheitsmagazin/detail/mit-algen-arthritis-heilen-1
Source

5. Mao TK, Van de Water J, Gershwin ME. Effects of a Spirulina-based dietary supplement on cytokine production from allergic rhinitis patients. J Med Food. 2005 Spring;8(1):27-30. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2005.8.27. PMID: 15857205.
Source

6. Staff, K. (2019, August 19). Algen für das Immunsystem? KULAU BLOG. https://kulau.de/blog/wie-algen-das-immunsystem-staerken
Source

7. Barsanti, L. & Gualtieri, P. (2014). Algae. Amsterdam University Press. https://books.google.at/books?id=uazMBQAAQBAJ&hl=de&lr=
Source

8. Bolton, J. J. & Stegenga, H. (2002). Seaweed species diversity in South Africa. South African Journal of Marine Science, 24(1), 9–18. https://doi.org/10.2989/025776102784528402
Source

9. Seaweed Extract Supplementation and Metabolic Biomarkers. (2019). Case Medical Research, 0. https://doi.org/10.31525/ct1-nct03853343
Source

10. Skibola, C. F., Curry, J. D., VandeVoort, C., Conley, A. & Smith, M. T. (2005b). Brown Kelp Modulates Endocrine Hormones in Female Sprague-Dawley Rats and in Human Luteinized Granulosa Cells. The Journal of Nutrition, 135(2), 296–300. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/135.2.296
Source

11. Blomhoff, R., Carlsen, M. H., Andersen, L. F. & Jacobs, D. R. (2006). Health benefits of nuts: potential role of antioxidants. British Journal of Nutrition, 96(S2), S52–S60. https://doi.org/10.1017/bjn20061864
Source

Artikel
Algen: Algen - Vielfalt aus dem Meer. (2020, Juni 25). BZfE. https://www.bzfe.de/inhalt/algen-556.html
Go to source
Studie
Kumar RM, Frankilin J, Raj SP. Accumulation of heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Pb and Cd) in freshwater micro algae (Chlorella sp.). J Environ Sci Eng. 2013 Jul;55(3):371-6. PMID: 25509955.
Go to source
Studie
Lee I, Tran M, Evans-Nguyen T, Stickle D, Kim S, Han J, Park JY, Yang M. Detoxification of chlorella supplement on heterocyclic amines in Korean young adults. Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2015 Jan;39(1):441-6. doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2014.11.015. Epub 2014 Dec 3. PMID: 25590673.
Go to source
Artikel
gesundu.de. (2017, September 6). Mit Algen Arthritis heilen? https://www.gesundu.de/gesundheitsmagazin/detail/mit-algen-arthritis-heilen-1
Go to source
Studie
Mao TK, Van de Water J, Gershwin ME. Effects of a Spirulina-based dietary supplement on cytokine production from allergic rhinitis patients. J Med Food. 2005 Spring;8(1):27-30. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2005.8.27. PMID: 15857205.
Go to source
Blog
Staff, K. (2019, August 19). Algen für das Immunsystem? KULAU BLOG. https://kulau.de/blog/wie-algen-das-immunsystem-staerken
Go to source
Buch
Barsanti, L. & Gualtieri, P. (2014). Algae. Amsterdam University Press. https://books.google.at/books?id=uazMBQAAQBAJ&hl=de&lr=
Go to source
Journal
Bolton, J. J. & Stegenga, H. (2002). Seaweed species diversity in South Africa. South African Journal of Marine Science, 24(1), 9–18. https://doi.org/10.2989/025776102784528402
Go to source
Studie
Seaweed Extract Supplementation and Metabolic Biomarkers. (2019). Case Medical Research, 0. https://doi.org/10.31525/ct1-nct03853343
Go to source
Journal
Skibola, C. F., Curry, J. D., VandeVoort, C., Conley, A. & Smith, M. T. (2005b). Brown Kelp Modulates Endocrine Hormones in Female Sprague-Dawley Rats and in Human Luteinized Granulosa Cells. The Journal of Nutrition, 135(2), 296–300. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/135.2.296
Go to source
Studie
Blomhoff, R., Carlsen, M. H., Andersen, L. F. & Jacobs, D. R. (2006). Health benefits of nuts: potential role of antioxidants. British Journal of Nutrition, 96(S2), S52–S60. https://doi.org/10.1017/bjn20061864
Go to source
Reviews