Last updated: August 10, 2021

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Snore stoppers are products that are designed to help you snore less. They can also improve the quality of your sleep. There are a few things to consider when choosing the right snore stopper. Above all, the scientific effectiveness plays a decisive role in the purchase.

In our big snore stopper test 2021 we show you the latest scientific findings on the subject of snore stoppers. We go into detail about the different effects of snore stoppers and how to use them. We also explain what you should look for when buying snore stoppers and present our personal favourites.




Summary

  • Snore stoppers can help you reduce snoring and improve the quality of your sleep.
  • However, the scientific effectiveness of snore stoppers is not always clearly proven. Therefore, the right choice of snore stopper depends mainly on your personal needs.
  • Before buying a snore stopper, you should get advice from an ENT doctor. He or she will know what is best for you.

The Best Snore Stopper: Our Choices

Buying and evaluation criteria for snore stoppers

In this section we explain what you should look for when buying snore stoppers. Various purchase and evaluation criteria play a role. We have compiled the most important buying and evaluation criteria for you.

You should consider the following criteria when buying snore stoppers:

We will show you exactly what you should look for in these criteria in the following sections.

Scientifically proven effect

The scientifically proven effect of snore stoppers is the most important criterion when buying. Our studies show both positive and no significant effects for different types of snore stoppers.

The effect of the snore stoppers depends mainly on the type of snore stopper.

In an investigation of several studies from 2016, nasal plasters led to a slight reduction in the frequency of snoring. However, no significant effect of nasal plasters on sleep quality was found.(1)

In another study from 2015, however, no improvement in snoring frequency was found with nose patches.(2)

In contrast, nasal spreaders, which are inserted into the nose, slightly improve sleep quality in addition to snoring. (1) In addition, they are suitable as a supportive measure for people who use a ventilator at night to be able to sleep better.(3)

In addition, nasal spreaders can help athletes as they reduce perceived fatigue.(4)

Lower jaw snore stoppers placed in the mouth also show positive effects. They help prevent snoring, increase sleep quality and provide beneficial changes in the upper airway. However, such snore stoppers should be as customised and adjustable as possible to achieve the best results.(5)

The effect of chin strap snore stoppers is controversial. One study found no improvement in breathing or sleep quality. The chinstrap also had no effect on snoring.(6)

However, a positive effect of chin straps could be observed in individual cases.(7)

Comfort

Even if the effect of the snore stopper of your choice is proven, the comfort should be right. Because if you wake up at night because the snore stopper bothers you, then it is no use if its effect is scientifically proven. It simply won't work.

Snore stoppers that you put in your nose or mouth can be perceived as annoying. This depends partly on your preferences and partly on the design of the individual snore stopper. It is best to try out the snore stopper. Then you will know whether it suits you or not.

If you are looking for a gentle method to stop snoring, snore patches are a good choice. These are simply stuck on your nose and are usually not irritating to the skin. So-called anti-snoring watches are also a gentle method against snoring.

They send electrical impulses that are not perceived during sleep and thus signal the sleeper to change his or her sleeping position.

In the following list you will find the gentle snore stoppers:

  • Nose patches
  • Anti-snoring watches

Ultimately, it is up to you to decide which snore stopper suits you best. Ideally, you should test as many variants as possible. Afterwards, you will certainly know which snore stopper variant works for you and which you like.

Material

When buying your snore stopper, you should make sure that you choose the right material. This is especially important for snore stoppers that you insert into your nose or mouth.

They should be made of soft materials, such as silicone, so that they adapt optimally to the shape of your nose or mouth.

You should also bear in mind that certain materials can cause allergies. So if possible, choose a material that is allergy-friendly.

Also make sure that the material is non-toxic and BPA-free. BPA is considered a hormonal pollutant and is associated with infertility, tumours and cancer, among other things.(8)

Snore stoppers should be BPA-free.

In addition, the material should be of good quality. A snore stopper made of high-quality material lasts longer and does not break as quickly. This also ensures better reusability.

As you can see, the material not only plays an important role for your comfort, but also for your health. So before you buy, weigh up carefully which snore stopper you ultimately choose. A good decision can save you money and frustration.

Handling

You are probably wondering how snore stoppers are used. This depends on the type of snore stopper you are using. Different snore stoppers are handled differently.

Nasal spreaders are inserted into the nose to widen the nostrils and improve breathing. Be careful when inserting them to avoid possible injuries. This also applies to the insertion and removal of mouth splints.

Snore stopper plasters are very easy to use. All you have to do is peel off the protective film and place the patch in the centre of your nose. Just like a real plaster. And when you wake up, you can simply pull it off again.

Then there are, for example, chin straps to prevent snoring. You put these under your chin and over your head to keep your mouth closed during the night. This is to prevent mouth breathing and encourage the body to breathe through the nose.

Last but not least, there are wristband snore stoppers. This requires a little technical understanding to set the snore stopper appropriately and make it work. During the night, the bracelet works automatically and you don't have to worry about anything.

Reusability

Reusable snore stoppers are practical and can be used for a long time. They have the advantage that you don't have to keep buying new snore stoppers. Again, reusability depends on the product you choose.

For example, snore stoppers such as nose patches are not reusable and have to be bought again once they are used up.

For snore stoppers for the mouth and nose, reusability depends very much on the material used and the quality of the product.

Type reusable
Chin strap reusable
Nasal spreader conditionally reusable
Mouth splint conditionally reusable
Anti-snoring watch conditionally reusable
Nasal plaster not reusable

Definitely reusable are chin straps. The reusability of anti-snoring watches is limited due to the built-in battery. The battery must be replaced after a certain period of time.

Guide: Frequently asked questions about snore stoppers answered in detail

You have more questions about snore stoppers? Don't worry! In order to inform you comprehensively about the effectiveness of different snore stoppers, we have summarised all the important information for you in the following guide. We refer to the current state of science.

What are snore stoppers?

Snore stoppers are, as the name suggests, products that help you stop snoring. Some snore stoppers have even been shown in studies to not only have a positive effect on snoring, but also on the quality of sleep.(9)

Schnarchstopper Schlafqualität

Good sleep is very important for our health. Snore stoppers can improve the quality of sleep. (Image source: Vladislav Muslakov / Unsplash)

There are different types of snore stoppers. Some provide a widened nasal opening to improve nasal breathing. Others fix the position of the jaw to keep the mouth closed at night to support natural nasal breathing.

Basically, snore stoppers either help you breathe better or help you maintain a healthy sleeping posture. You can read more about the different types of snore stoppers in the next section.

What types of snore stoppers are there?

Snore stoppers are available for the nose, for the mouth and as bracelets. Depending on the type of product, snore stoppers work in a different way.

If you want to buy snore stoppers, you can choose between the following types:

Type Description
Snore stoppers Nasal spreaders Nasal spreaders are inserted into the nose and spread the nostrils apart. They make it easier to breathe through the nose.
Snore stopper nose plasters nose plasters are stuck on the nose at night and removed in the morning. They gently open the nostrils and thus improve breathing.
Snore stoppers for the mouth Snore stoppers for the mouth are usually mouth splints that push the lower jaw forward. This opens the windpipe and improves breathing.
Snore stoppers Chin straps Chin straps are tightened under the chin and over the head. They are made of a flexible material and are designed to keep the jaw in a good position.
Snore stopper wristband Electric wristbands send impulses as soon as the person wearing them starts to snore. This is supposed to cause the sleeping position to be changed and thus improve the quality of sleep.

Want to know more about the different types of snore stoppers? No problem! We have compiled the most important information about the individual types of snore stoppers for you in the following sections.

Schnarchstopper Nasenspreizer

Snore stopper nose spreader

Nasal spreaders widen the nostrils, making it easier to breathe through the nose. In some studies, nasal spreaders not only prevented snoring, but also improved the quality of sleep. (1, 3, 10) Athletes can also benefit from nasal spreaders.(4)

Nasal spreaders are also easy to clean and usually reusable. They work via built-in magnets. A disadvantage can be the insertion into the nose. For some people, this could be uncomfortable and therefore nasal spreaders are not suitable as snore stoppers.

The advantages and disadvantages of snore stoppers are summarised in the following overview:

Advantages
  • Facilitate nasal breathing
  • Reusable
  • Easy to clean
Disadvantages
  • Must be inserted into the nose
  • May be perceived as uncomfortable

Nasal spreaders are a good way to improve nasal breathing while you sleep and therefore reduce snoring. They are suitable for you if you do not find it uncomfortable to put them in your nose.

Schnarchstopper Nasenpflaster

Snore stopper nose patches

Nose patches are the gentlest form of snore stopper. Before going to bed, you stick them in the middle of your nose. Due to their inherent tension, nose patches lift the nostrils and gently pull them apart. This makes it easier to breathe through the nose and thus helps to prevent snoring.

Even though nose patches have been shown to make breathing through the nose easier, their effect on sleep quality is controversial. On the one hand, there are studies that could not prove the effectiveness of nose patches on sleep quality.(1)

On the other hand, there are studies that have shown a significant effect of nasal plasters on sleep quality and quality of life.(9)

The advantages of snore stoppers in the form of a nose patch are their ease of use and comfortable design. They are very gentle and skin-friendly. As a result, they do not disturb the user during sleep.

You can expect the following advantages and disadvantages when buying snore stoppers:

Advantages
  • Easy to use
  • Comfortable
  • Skin-friendly
Disadvantages
  • Not reusable
  • Must be applied exactly

A small disadvantage of the nose plasters is that they are not reusable. When all the patches in a pack are used up, you have to buy new ones. In addition, they only work if they are applied exactly in the middle of the nose. Not too high and not too deep.

Schnarchstopper für den Mund

Snore stoppers for the mouth

Snore stoppers for the mouth are splints that are placed in the mouth to push the lower jaw forward. This clears the airways and can thus alleviate or prevent snoring.(5)

Studies show that mouth splints can both prevent snoring and improve sleep quality. However, they should be made individually, as each person has a different jaw shape. Mass-produced products could quickly lead to negative effects.(5)

Snore stoppers for the mouth have various advantages and disadvantages. These are briefly summarised in the following overview:

Advantages
  • Reusable
  • Easy to clean
  • Fix the jaw
Disadvantages
  • Have to be adjusted to the shape of the jaw
  • May be uncomfortable to wear
  • Good quality has its price

Snore stoppers for the mouth are also easy to clean and reusable. A disadvantage could be the insertion into the mouth. For some people, the splint is uncomfortable and thus tends to interfere with sleeping.

Schnarchstopper Kinnriemen

Snore stopper chin strap

Snore stopper chin straps are stretched over the head and under the chin. They are usually made of a soft and flexible material to increase comfort. Chin straps are designed to keep the jaw in the correct position and thus prevent snoring.

The effectiveness of chin straps as a snore stopper has not yet been scientifically proven. (6) However, individual cases show that chin straps can indeed improve breathing and may therefore be suitable for people with sleep problems.(7)

It is therefore best to find out for yourself whether a chin strap improves the quality of your sleep.

Snore stopper chin straps have various advantages and disadvantages. These are briefly summarised in the following overview:

Advantages
  • Reusable
  • Easy to use
  • Fixes the jaw
Disadvantages
  • Not helpful for everyone
  • May be uncomfortable to wear

Chin straps as snore stoppers are easy to use and reusable. They hold the jaw in place and can improve breathing. However, they do not help everyone. In addition, wearing a chin strap may be uncomfortable and could therefore interfere with sleep.

Schnarchstopper Armband

Snore stopper bracelet

A snore stopper bracelet is supposed to signal the snorer during sleep via electrical impulses when he snores. As a result, the person should automatically change their sleeping position, which in turn can lead to increased sleep quality.

The effectiveness of this type of snore stopper has not yet been sufficiently studied. If you are thinking about buying a snore stopper bracelet, we advise you to try it out for yourself. It might work for you. You have to find out for yourself.

Snore stopper bracelets have different advantages and disadvantages. These are briefly summarised in the following overview:

Advantages
  • Works automatically
  • Gentle method
Disadvantages
  • Batteries must be changed
  • Effect not scientifically proven

Snore stopper bracelets are, if they work for you, an interesting method to prevent snoring and to achieve a better quality of sleep. However, their effect is not scientifically proven. You should therefore use them with caution.

The different types of snore stoppers have different advantages and disadvantages.

How much do snore stoppers cost?

The price of snore stoppers varies depending on the type and number of products and their quality. For example, you can buy nose plasters for around €4. On the other hand, you can also buy high-quality mouth splints for up to about €130.

Depending on how many nose plasters you want to buy and what brand they are, they cost between €4 and €20. Nose spreaders are usually available for between €5 and €20. You can find chin straps for around €8 to €25.

Type Price
Nose plaster approx. 4 - 20 euros
Mouth splint approx. 8 - 130 euros
Nose spreader approx. 5 - 20 euros
Bracelet approx. 10 - 70 euros
Chin strap approx. 8 - 25 euros

Electric wristbands are a little more expensive because of their technology. You can find them for between about €10 and €70. You can also buy prefabricated mouth splints for about 8 to 130 €.

Schnarchstopper Atmung

Proper breathing is very important when you are sleeping. Snore stoppers help you breathe through your nose and can promote restful sleep. (Image source: Claudio Scott / Pixabay)

However, it is better to buy a custom-made mouthguard, as prefabricated mouthguards can have negative effects.(5)

How do snore stoppers work?

Snore stoppers work differently depending on the type of product. Nose patches widen the nostrils and help you breathe better through the nose.(9)

Nasal spreaders, on the other hand, are inserted into the nose and work via magnets. They also help against snoring.(1, 3)

Snore stoppers are also available as mouth splints. These are inserted into the mouth and push the lower jaw forward. This expands the upper airways and thus prevents snoring.(5)

Snore stoppers are also available as wristbands. This bracelet sends electrical impulses as soon as the person wearing the bracelet starts snoring. However, the effect of this snore stopper has not yet been sufficiently researched.

Last but not least, a chin strap works by locking the jaw in place and thus improving breathing. Chinstraps are designed to hold the jaw in its natural position. The effect of chinstraps is controversial, but has shown positive effects on sleep in isolated cases.(7)

Who are snore stoppers suitable for?

Snore stoppers are suitable for people who have problems with their snoring. On the other hand, they might be depriving other people of sleep because of their snoring. In this case, it could be helpful to use snore stoppers out of consideration for these people.

Furthermore, various studies have shown that snore stoppers are not only suitable for snorers, but also for other groups of people. This is because they can improve breathing and this is not only important for snorers.

In the following, these groups of people are listed with the corresponding studies:

  • Athletes: Snore stoppers have been shown to significantly reduce perceived fatigue during running and may therefore be suitable for athletes to enhance athletic performance.(4)
  • People with obstructive sleep apnoea: These people struggle with breathing pauses during sleep and often need to wear ventilators during sleep. Snore stoppers could significantly support the effect of these ventilators. (3)
  • Insomniacs: In a 2006 study, snore stoppers were able to significantly improve the sleep and quality of life of people struggling with insomnia.(9)

Snore stoppers are therefore suitable for all groups of people who have problems with their breathing. These breathing problems can lead to restrictions in everyday life and to sleep disturbances. Therefore, snore stoppers could provide relief.

How do I use snore stoppers correctly?

The use of snore stoppers depends on the type of product. For example, if you bought a mouth guard to prevent snoring, you have to wear it in your mouth at night. A nasal retractor, on the other hand, is worn inside the nose.

Snore stoppers in the form of bracelets are worn on your arm while you sleep. There are also snore stoppers in the form of chin straps. These are made of a flexible material and are stretched under the chin and over the head.

There are also snore stoppers in the form of plasters. These patches are placed in the middle of your nose before you go to bed. When you wake up in the morning, you remove the patch.

Which snore stoppers really help?

Snore stoppers come in many different types and shapes. However, their effectiveness has not always been scientifically proven. The effectiveness of most snore stoppers is also controversial.

Various studies have shown that mouth splints, nose patches and nose spreaders can have a significant positive effect on snoring. However, this does not necessarily mean that this is always the case.(1, 3, 5)

For snore stoppers in the form of chin straps and bracelets, the scientific effectiveness has not yet been sufficiently studied. We recommend that you try these types of snore stoppers yourself to see if they help you personally.

What are the alternatives to snore stoppers?

In addition to snore stoppers, there are several alternatives to snoring. In the following section, we will give you a brief overview of the alternatives to snore stoppers.

  • Training the throat muscles: Poorly trained throat muscles can lead to snoring because the muscles are very slack. Training the muscles of the mouth and throat has therefore been shown to reduce snoring.(2)
  • Reduce unnecessary body fat: Overweight people are more likely to suffer from snoring. This is due to fat storage in the throat tissue. Reducing the fatty tissue can help.(11)
  • Change the sleeping position: Sleeping on your back can promote snoring. In a scientific study, it was shown that training a different sleeping position can have a positive effect on snoring.(12)
  • Changing the sleeping position: Sleeping on your back can promote snoring. In a scientific study, it was shown that training a different sleeping position can have a positive effect on snoring.(12)
  • Abstaining from alcohol: Al cohol leads to poorer sleep. It interrupts the sleep phases and impairs proper breathing. Among other things, it also leads to snoring. Therefore, abstaining from alcohol can be helpful to improve the quality of sleep.(13)

As you can see, there are a lot of alternatives to snore stoppers. It is up to you which alternative you ultimately use.

Schnarchstopper Alternativen

One alternative to snore stoppers is regular exercise. This will help you lose unnecessary excess weight. (Image source: Alora Griffiths / Unsplash)

Each of these alternatives has its own advantages and disadvantages and will certainly help you. For example, you can also reduce snoring with exercise.

How do I make my own snore stopper?

It is better not to make your own snore stopper. It is better to rely on existing products that have already received many good customer reviews. Then you can be sure that the product works.

You can easily make a mistake with a self-made snore stopper. Especially snore stoppers for the mouth and nose have to be made of soft or compatible material. They should also adapt well to the shape of your head. It is better to use existing snore stoppers.

You should not try to make your own snore stoppers.

What are snore stoppers from the lion's den good for?

The snore stopper called Smartsleep was able to achieve an investment of 1.5 million euros at Höhle der Löwen. The product is said to have been designed by several researchers from Harvard University, who spent years researching it. But does Smartsleep really work?

Smartsleep is a dietary supplement that is supposed to support your sleep. Its ingredients are creatine, riboflavin, glycine, zinc, thiamine, biotin, niacin, magnesium, vitamin B6, vitamin C and panthothenic acid.

However, the effect of Smartsleep has not been scientifically studied and should therefore be taken with caution.

Conclusion

Snore stoppers can help you breathe easier and thus reduce snoring. They can also have a positive effect on the quality of your sleep. However, science still disagrees on many things regarding the exact effect of snore stoppers. It is best to consult an ENT doctor to find out which snore stoppers are suitable for you.

There are also a few things to consider before buying your snore stopper. Which type of snore stopper would you prefer to use? Which snore stopper has been scientifically proven to work? What is the quality of the snore stopper? Only then can you decide which snore stopper you should buy.

Picture source: Popov / 123rf

References (13)

1. Camacho, M., Malu, O. O., Kram, Y. A., Nigam, G., Riaz, M., Song, S. A., Tolisano, A. M., & Kushida, C. A. (2016). Nasal Dilators (Breathe Right Strips and NoZovent) for Snoring and OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Pulmonary medicine, 2016, 4841310. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/4841310
Source

2. Ieto, V., Kayamori, F., Montes, M. I., Hirata, R. P., Gregório, M. G., Alencar, A. M., ... & Lorenzi-Filho, G. (2015). Effects of oropharyngeal exercises on snoring: a randomized trial. Chest, 148(3), 683-691.
Source

3. Gelardi, M., Intiglietta, P., Porro, G., Quaranta, V. N., Resta, O., Quaranta, N., & Ciprandi, G. (2019). Internal nasal dilator in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and treated with continuous positive airway pressure. Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis, 90(2-S), 24–27. https://doi.org/10.23750/abm.v90i2-S.8100
Source

4. Gelardi, M., Porro, G., Accettura, D., Quaranta, V. N., Quaranta, N., & Ciprandi, G. (2019). The role of an internal nasal dilator in athletes. Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis, 90(2-S), 28–30. https://doi.org/10.23750/abm.v90i2-S.8101
Source

5. Serra-Torres, S., Bellot-Arcís, C., Montiel-Company, J. M., Marco-Algarra, J., & Almerich-Silla, J. M. (2016). Effectiveness of mandibular advancement appliances in treating obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A systematic review. The Laryngoscope, 126(2), 507–514. https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.25505
Source

6. Bhat, S., Gushway-Henry, N., Polos, P. G., DeBari, V. A., Riar, S., Gupta, D., Lysenko, L., Patel, D., Pi, J., & Chokroverty, S. (2014). The efficacy of a chinstrap in treating sleep disordered breathing and snoring. Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 10(8), 887–892. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.3962
Source

7. Vorona, R. D., & Ware, J. C. (2014). Use of a chinstrap in treating sleep disordered breathing and snoring. Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 10(12), 1361. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.4304
Source

8. Konieczna, A., Rutkowska, A., & Rachoń, D. (2015). Health risk of exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA). Roczniki Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny, 66(1), 5–11.
Source

9. Krakow, B., Melendrez, D., Sisley, B., Warner, T. D., Krakow, J., Leahigh, L., & Lee, S. (2006). Nasal dilator strip therapy for chronic sleep-maintenance insomnia and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing: a randomized controlled trial. Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 10(1), 16–28. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11325-005-0037-7
Source

10. Gelardi, M., Intiglietta, P., Porro, G., Quaranta, V. N., Resta, O., Quaranta, N., & Ciprandi, G. (2019). Internal nasal dilator in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis, 90(2-S), 19–23. https://doi.org/10.23750/abm.v90i2-S.8099
Source

11. Stuck, B. A., & Hofauer, B. (2019). The Diagnosis and Treatment of Snoring in Adults. Deutsches Arzteblatt international, 116(48), 817–824. https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2019.0817
Source

12. Benoist, L., Beelen, A., Torensma, B., & de Vries, N. (2018). Subjective effects of the sleep position trainer on snoring outcomes in position-dependent non-apneic snorers. European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 275(8), 2169–2176. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-018-5036-y
Source

13. He, S., Hasler, B. P., & Chakravorty, S. (2019). Alcohol and sleep-related problems. Current opinion in psychology, 30, 117–122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2019.03.007
Source

Why you can trust me?

Systematischer Review und Meta Analyse
Camacho, M., Malu, O. O., Kram, Y. A., Nigam, G., Riaz, M., Song, S. A., Tolisano, A. M., & Kushida, C. A. (2016). Nasal Dilators (Breathe Right Strips and NoZovent) for Snoring and OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Pulmonary medicine, 2016, 4841310. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/4841310
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Ieto, V., Kayamori, F., Montes, M. I., Hirata, R. P., Gregório, M. G., Alencar, A. M., ... & Lorenzi-Filho, G. (2015). Effects of oropharyngeal exercises on snoring: a randomized trial. Chest, 148(3), 683-691.
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Gelardi, M., Intiglietta, P., Porro, G., Quaranta, V. N., Resta, O., Quaranta, N., & Ciprandi, G. (2019). Internal nasal dilator in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and treated with continuous positive airway pressure. Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis, 90(2-S), 24–27. https://doi.org/10.23750/abm.v90i2-S.8100
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Untersuchung
Gelardi, M., Porro, G., Accettura, D., Quaranta, V. N., Quaranta, N., & Ciprandi, G. (2019). The role of an internal nasal dilator in athletes. Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis, 90(2-S), 28–30. https://doi.org/10.23750/abm.v90i2-S.8101
Go to source
Systematischer Review
Serra-Torres, S., Bellot-Arcís, C., Montiel-Company, J. M., Marco-Algarra, J., & Almerich-Silla, J. M. (2016). Effectiveness of mandibular advancement appliances in treating obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A systematic review. The Laryngoscope, 126(2), 507–514. https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.25505
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Bhat, S., Gushway-Henry, N., Polos, P. G., DeBari, V. A., Riar, S., Gupta, D., Lysenko, L., Patel, D., Pi, J., & Chokroverty, S. (2014). The efficacy of a chinstrap in treating sleep disordered breathing and snoring. Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 10(8), 887–892. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.3962
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Vorona, R. D., & Ware, J. C. (2014). Use of a chinstrap in treating sleep disordered breathing and snoring. Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 10(12), 1361. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.4304
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Konieczna, A., Rutkowska, A., & Rachoń, D. (2015). Health risk of exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA). Roczniki Panstwowego Zakladu Higieny, 66(1), 5–11.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Krakow, B., Melendrez, D., Sisley, B., Warner, T. D., Krakow, J., Leahigh, L., & Lee, S. (2006). Nasal dilator strip therapy for chronic sleep-maintenance insomnia and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing: a randomized controlled trial. Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 10(1), 16–28. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11325-005-0037-7
Go to source
Klinische Studie
Gelardi, M., Intiglietta, P., Porro, G., Quaranta, V. N., Resta, O., Quaranta, N., & Ciprandi, G. (2019). Internal nasal dilator in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Acta bio-medica : Atenei Parmensis, 90(2-S), 19–23. https://doi.org/10.23750/abm.v90i2-S.8099
Go to source
Systematischer Review
Stuck, B. A., & Hofauer, B. (2019). The Diagnosis and Treatment of Snoring in Adults. Deutsches Arzteblatt international, 116(48), 817–824. https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2019.0817
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Wissenschaftliche Untersuchung
Benoist, L., Beelen, A., Torensma, B., & de Vries, N. (2018). Subjective effects of the sleep position trainer on snoring outcomes in position-dependent non-apneic snorers. European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 275(8), 2169–2176. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-018-5036-y
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Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
He, S., Hasler, B. P., & Chakravorty, S. (2019). Alcohol and sleep-related problems. Current opinion in psychology, 30, 117–122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2019.03.007
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Reviews